Tag Archives: lei

What Does Hawaii Taste Like?


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Much to everyone’s dismay, I uploaded quite a few videos of my experience in Hawaii. I’m not going to apologize – we only typically talk tech! Even when I wasn’t talking about tech, I was using tech to talk about the things I was doing! Yes, this video is about Hawaii. I received a care package from Troy in Honolulu the other day, and wanted to do a video to honor the occasion.

He sent a nice letter along with the care package. He was sad that he wasn’t able to meet me while I was in Hawaii. He asked if, instead, I could open his box in a video! That’s easy enough to do.

First, I received a container from Zippy’s, along with some chopsticks. The food there was amazing, which is why I ended up recording a video to tease all of you! Zippy’s ended up posting the video to their Facebook fan page, which was really cool! Sadly, the container is empty.

Next I pulled out a couple of containers of Macadamia nuts. I love them, so I’m looking forward to munching on them. There were even chocolate-covered Macadamia nuts!!

Last, but certainly not least, I was leid yet again. There was a Lei in the box, made from Macadamia nuts!! How cool is that? You can’t Lei yourself though. It has to be done by someone else, and then you have to receive a kiss. So, I’m not going to put the Lei on yet. I’m going to have to find someone who can do this for me.

I had a great time in Hawaii this last time, and I am absolutely looking forward to visiting again one day.

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Hula Dancing


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While I was in Hawaii last week, I was fortunate to be able to experience many local customs and traditions. One of these is, of course, Hula dancing. There is a lot more to this than you would expect, and it makes for one heck of an awesome show! Do you know what the tradition behind Hula dancing is?

Hula is a dance form accompanied by chant or song. It was developed in the Hawaiian Islands by the Polynesians who originally settled there. The chant or song is called a mele. The hula dramatizes or comments on the mele.

Hula performed for spontaneous daily amusement or family feasts were attended with no particular ceremony. However, hula performed as entertainment for chiefs were anxious affairs. High chiefs typically traveled from one place to another within their domains. Each locality had to house, feed, and amuse the chief and his or her entourage. Hula performances were a form of fealty, and often of flattery to the chief. There were hula celebrating his lineage and his name. Sacred hula, celebrating Hawaiian gods, were also danced. All these performances must be completed without error (which would be both unlucky and disrespectful).

It’s absolutely beautiful to watch – and not just because the women themselves are gorgeous. Hula dancing is truly an art form, and something you definitely should make time to witness yourself if you are ever in Hawaii.

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I Got Leid!


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One tradition in Hawaii is to present someone with a Lei – and a kiss on the cheek! Lei giving is a regular part of any special occasion such as birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, and graduations. It is not uncommon for a graduating senior to have so many leis around their neck that they can no longer see!

There are, however, a couple of “unspoken rules” one should know when receiving a lei for the first time. A lei should be a welcomed celebration of one person’s affection to another. Therefore, always accept a lei, never refuse. The proper way to wear a lei is gently draped over the shoulders, hanging down both in front and in back. It is considered rude to remove a lei from your neck in the presence of the person who gave it to you, so if you must, be discreet.

Lei giving is a regular part of any special occasion such as birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, and graduations. It is not uncommon for a graduating senior to have so many leis around their neck that they can no longer see!

I was leid not once, but twice! Have I mentioned yet that I love Hawaii?

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