Tag Archives: graphic-arts

Top 5 Tips for Game Developers

David is an active community member who goes by the handle Paru-Sama in our chat room. He is a budding game developer, and has some tips to pass along to those of you who are thinking of getting into the same field.

  • Play Video games. – You can’t go for a game developing career if you don’t have any idea what a game is or how the player plays it without experiencing it for your self. Game play and originality are the key factors of designing a game
  • Learn Scripting and Calculus. – The video game developing career involves A LOT of math along with the complications of scripting/coding. C++ is a powerful programming language, but I don’t recommend it as your first. It is very difficult to learn so I recommend learning easier programing languages that are made for beginners, such as Visual Basic.
  • Enroll in a Digital arts and Graphic Design or Multi Media course if you’re planning on being a Graphical Art Designer. – This is (In my opinion) the most enjoyable part of being a game developer as it employs your visual creativity and originality. 3Dmax and Maya are two of the tools used in this course. There is also a program called “zBrush” which is a 3d sculpting program. This uses your dexterity instead of your calculating abilities to build 3D models. There are also other graphical programs used in this course such as Photoshop from Adobe.
  • Try out open source software developing kits. – There are game developers that allow the community to twinkle with their games by giving them tools to make maps, mods or whole games . One popular game developer that does this as a strategy is Valve. If you buy a game from them, they will allow you to download the “Source SDK.” This is a software developing kit based on their game engine (called “the source engine”) which will allow you to map for a game that they already created – or make a game of your own.
  • Apply to be a video game beta tester. – This job is what the names says. You can get paid to play games in their early state as long as you give the developers some feedback about their games. This isn’t like you play a demo game and they pay you for it. It requires you to have a sharp eye and ears to spot some bugs and glitches. It also requires an ability to criticize the game. The feedback you give will help them improve the game’s gameplay.

If you’re a game designer, what other tips do you have for the Geeks in our community who plan to enter this field?