Tag Archives: safari

How to Convince Someone to Switch Web Browsers


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Someone in the live chat room recently asked how they can convince a relative to stop using Internet Explorer. The answer is that you really can’t – and you shouldn’t. They use what they use because they like it. It’s a matter of personal preference, folks. How would you like it if someone told you you need to stop using Chrome, Firefox or Safari? You’d not be a very happy camper.

If they aren’t happy and are looking for suggestions, then go ahead and give them your ideas. When you try to convince someone to change – whether it’s Web browsers or even religions – you’re superimposing your experiences onto them. You’re forcing your own opinions and perspectives on someone’s life.

If they’re using IE for all the wrong reasons (such as using a very old version), that’s a bad reason. Explain to them why it may not be safe. It may work well and look good to them, but it isn’t safe. Tell them the dangers, and help them understand why they should upgrade or look at a different browser.

If you are going to insist on trying to get someone to change, don’t simply say something is better or faster. You will never win them over. Point out specific features you feel they would appreciate and need that they cannot get in the browser they are using now. The same can hold true if you are talking about phones, gadgets or computers.

Show them something they will be able to do outside of the limitations of what they have now. Ask them what they want their browser (or anything) to do, then show them what fits best with their needs – even if it is Internet Explorer.

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Safari 5.0.1 Brings Extensions to the Table

Apple released Safari 5.0.1 into the wilds today. Also introduced at long last is the Safari Extensions Gallery. Apple introduced extensions last June, giving developers time to begin creating browser add-ons using HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript standards. This move brings Safari into play again alongside Chrome and Firefox – both of which already support addon features.

What came as a surprise was the name of a few of the new extensions – namely those from Bing and Amazon. You’ll also find extensions for MLB.com, the New York Times, Twitter and eBay. You can access the new extensions within the browser, and install with a single click. You’ll not have to restart Safari for your choices to take affect, unlike what you have to do with Firefox.

Manage your addons within your Safari window and update with a single click. Disable or enable individual extensions or turn them all off at once. Each extension comes with a signed, digital certificate from Apple to “prevent tampering.” This also verifies that updates come from the original developer. Your extensions are also sandboxed. This will keep them from being able to access information on your system, and disallows communication with websites other than those specified by the developer.

It's Time to Use a Different Browser When…


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Over on Lockergnome.net, Michael asked people which web browser they prefer, and why. This is something I am asked constantly. It certainly seems as though everyone has a definite preference: there are over a thousand views on that question alone, and several pages’ worth of answers. I’ve been using Safari for quite awhile, but I think I’m on the cusp of switching to something different.

The one I’m thinking of using is another webkit browser – Google Chrome. To be more specific, I plan on using the browser on which Chrome is based – Chromium. It’s very powerful, and it’s only getting better. It’s exceedingly fast, and there are a lot of extensions already available. Heck, there’s already five extensions that have been made by our community members that each have something to do with what we do on a daily basis!

It’s a big deal for most people when you switch primary browsers. There’s usually a good reason that you decided to make the change. Let’s face it – we hate change most of the time, even when it comes to our browsers. I’ve used Safari for nearly three years now, so yeah – this is a big deal for me.

With Chromium, I get nightly update builds loaded right onto my computer. That’s important to me… I’m always on the bleeding edge with the latest they have to offer. When you spend as much time as I do surfing the Internet, having the best browser available is critical.

Which browser do YOU use, and why is it your favorite?

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Safari 5

http://apple.com/safari/

This update contains new features including:

  • Safari Reader: Click on the new Reader icon to view articles on the web in a single, clutter-free page.
  • Improved Performance: Safari 5 executes JavaScript up to 25% faster than Safari 4. Better page caching and DNS prefetching speed up browsing.
  • Bing Search Option: New Bing search option for Safari’s Search Field, in addition to Google and Yahoo!.
  • Improved HTML5 support: Safari supports over a dozen new HTML5 features, including Geolocation, full screen for HTML5 video, closed captions for HTML5 video, new sectioning elements (article, aside, footer, header, hgroup, nav and section), HTML5 AJAX History, EventSource, WebSocket, HTML5 draggable attribute, HTML5 forms validation, and HTML5 Ruby.
  • Safari Developer Tools: A new Timeline Panel in the Web Inspector shows how Safari interacts with a website and identifies areas for optimization. New keyboard shortcuts make it faster to switch between panels.

Other improvements include:

  • Smarter Address Field: The Smart Address Field can now match text against the titles of webpages in History and Bookmarks, as well as any part of their URL.
  • Tabs Setting: Automatically open new webpages in tabs instead of in separate windows.
  • Hardware Acceleration for Windows: Use the power of the computer’s graphics processor to smoothly display media and effects on PC as well as Mac.
  • Search History with Date: A new date indicator in Full History Search shows when webpages were viewed.
  • Top Sites/History Button: Switch easily between Top Sites and Full History Search with a new button that appears at the top of each view.
  • Private Browsing Icon: A “Private” icon appears in the Smart Address Field when Private Browsing is on. Click on the icon to turn off Private Browsing.
  • DNS Prefetching: Safari looks up the addresses of links on webpages and can load those pages faster.
  • Improved Page Caching: Safari can add additional types of webpages to the cache so they load quickly.
  • XSS Auditor: Safari can filter potentially malicious scripts used in cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks.
  • Improved JavaScript Support: Safari allows web applications that use JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) to run faster and more securely.

For more information about fixes that improve performance, stability and compatibility, please see: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4134

For information on the security content of this update, please visit:http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1222

Blizzard Cashes in on Virtual Game Spending

I think I am in the wrong line of business. I knew already that Facebook’s Farmville was a huge hit. Every time I log into the site, I see people harvesting their crops and begging me to fertilize them. I’ve also seen people cooking up delicious things in their restaurants on Cafe World. I’ve heard (and read) that you can use real money to advance yourself in these games. I had no idea, though, just how huge of a market this is until now.

The people behind World of Warcraft, Blizzard Entertainment, struck gold this week – literally. In the past, they have occasionally offered limited-edition virtual pets for sale in their online store. Pay Blizz some real money, and you can have yourself a seriously cool pet on the toon of your choosing. This week, the geniuses introduced a new Celestial Steed, which allows you to “travel in style astride wings of pure elemental stardust.” I’ll admit that the steed is pretty cool looking. But I can’t see paying twenty-five real dollars for it if I was already paying fifteen every month just for the privilege of playing the game.

Apparently, one heck of a lot of people disagree with me, though. Blizz is reporting that in the first four hours that the mount was available they made an astonishing two MILLION dollars just off of that pet alone. That is over eight-thousand smackers per minute.

The mount doesn’t give a player any advantages in the game over other subscribers. It simply looks cool. Who knew that you could make a fortune in moments through a virtual game? I need to put my brain to work to come up with one of my own.

Photo courtesy of MMO Champion and Blizzard Entertainment.

You don’t have to play WoW or even join Facebook in order to see what’s new in our software center.

Top Ten Features of Safari on the iPad

Many of you have been using Safari on your Mac or PC for quite some time. You may love the way it looks and feels, or even adore the speed at which it runs. However, I have a feeling you’re going to love Safari even more on the iPad. There are several little quirks and tricks built in to the browser experience for use on the iPad that I think are going to be a huge hit across the board.

  • The larger screen will allow you to view entire web pages at once, unlike what you see on smaller mobile devices.
  • To open a link found on any page, simply tap it. In the case of a URL shortener or “disguised” link, you can tap and hold to see what the url is prior to actually opening it.
  • Rotate your iPad to change easily for Portrait to Landscape view, and Safari automatically adjusts itself to fit your entire screen.
  • Tap the + sign on any page to quickly add it to your bookmarks.
  • Flick your finger across the screen to scroll up or down a page.
  • Pinch your fingers on the page to zoom in or out.
  • The text will be large enough on the screen to actually see and read it easily.
  • The Thumbnail view allows you to see all of the pages you have open in a small grid pattern. This lets you quickly change from one site or page to another.
  • Safari on the iPad supports the latest video innovations found in HTML5. You can watch compatible videos from within the page, or double-tap them to watch full screen.
  • Sync your bookmarks from your Safari install on your Mac or PC. It only takes a moment. This ensures that you always have your favorite sites right at your fingertips.

Don’t get me wrong: Safari works great on other devices and machines. However, from the looks of things in this video, I think it’s going to be an even better browsing experience on the iPad when it gets here.

Block Ads in Safari

Many people prefer to enhance their browsing experience by adding features such as AdBlocking. With Safari, that is more difficult to do than it is with other browsers. Several of you also choose to block Flash applications, using plugins such as NoScript. However, Alex wrote in to tell all of you about a much easier-to-use plug-in that can be loaded onto Safari.

ClickToFlash is a Flash-blocking plug-in for Safari on Mac OS X. By installing ClickToFlash, you will no longer have Flash-based applications load automatically on the computer. Instead, you can choose (or not choose) to click just once to allow the Flash object to play. This way, you get Flash only when you want it!

You can also configure ClickToFlash to always allow Flash to load on certain websites. In addition, ClickToFlash allows you to view YouTube videos in QuickTime, instead of Flash! You can also change your settings right in ClickToFlash to always (only!) display YouTube videos in H.264, no matter what video you’re watching! Simply go into Safari and ClickToFlash, then choose the “Settings” option. From there, just check a box to allow the default to change.

Thanks Alex, for sharing this with us. I hadn’t yet tried this out, but you can bet I’ll be installing it today!

How to Remove Internet Explorer 8


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Marques has been an excellent screencast contributor in the past months, and today’s addition is no exception. Many people prefer to never use Internet Explorer, instead choosing one of the many other browser offerings. Marques is using this screencast to show you how can you remove IE 8 from your computer entirely. Be forewarned, however, that doing so could possibly cause some Windows programs and files to not work properly. Another solution is to simply remove the IE icon from your Start Menu and desktop, and just don’t open it. Also, of course, you may need IE at some point for your Windows Updates (many ppl still use that method to get the updates).

To remove Internet Explorer, you first want to head into your Control Panel. Once there, go into your “Programs” area. Once there, you’ll notice a button near the top (under the heading Programs and Features) that says Turn Windows Features On and Off. Click on that to bring up a window that will help you do just that.

Uncheck the Internet Explorer box, and you’ll have it fully removed. There are also other things in the box that you can safely remove, such as the Tablet features (IF you’re not using a Tablet, of course!). Make sure you thoroughly research all of the things found in the list before you decide what you want to uncheck!

That’s all there is to it. Removing Internet Explorer is fairly quick and easy to do, and may help keep your system running a little faster without some of the previous bloat associated with it.

Thanks, Marques, for another outstanding screencast!

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PlayPlay

Does Internet Explorer Suck?


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We all must browse the web. Unfortunately, the Lynx browser is no longer cutting it. If you don’t remember it, then you are not old like I am. PC PitStop community member James asks if Internet Explorer is safe yet. He’s been waiting to use the newest version, because he’s heard that it has a lot of problems. What are your thoughts on this? Is IE solid, and safe?

The consensus in the chat room was that Internet Explorer is just not there yet. However, the answer is both yes and no. Every browser has its own set of issues. Every browser is as safe as every other web browser… and as safe as the user. There’s really no way to guage if it’s safe enough of not.

Every browser is going to have bugs, and security flaws. If you connect to the Internet, then you have security risks on your hands. If you’ve heard that people have had issues, then by all means, wait if you aren’t ready to upgrade. However, I’ve been using the newest version and haven’t had issues.

You could also use IEs Compatibility Mode, or choose a different browser. You can use any one that you wish, you know. Just because you have that little icon on your desktop doesn’t necessarily mean that you are required to use it. That’s the beauty of the Internet!

My recommendation is always to upgrade to the latest version of any browser. If you arent happy with it, then simply try something else!

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No New Firefox Before the End of the Year

Mozilla had long been promising version Firefox 3.6 by the end of this year. According to their website, that goal has now been pushed back to early 2010. Also, version 4.0, which promises to be a major update, has been pushed back to late 2010 or early 2011. This is leaving some Mozilla fans with a case of the grumpies. However, they need to remember that all good things are worth waiting for.

Didn’t we learn any lessons from Windows Vista? Didn’t we all witness first-hand what happens when a company rushes a product out the door before it’s truly ready to be on the market? If the folks at Mozilla feel they need more time to deliver a solid product, then I say we give it to them and stop griping about it!

The big new feature in version 3.6 is incorporation of the Personas plug-in that lets people easily customize the browser’s appearance, though behind the scenes there’s also been work to speed up the browser’s launch time, improve security, and make some other changes. There have already been five beta versions released, but we’ve yet to see the release candidate. An RC signals to the masses that a final version is nearly ready.

There is a lot of competition in the browser wars these days, and releasing newer and better versions is always under a time-crunch. However, I repeat again that I’d rather wait a little longer for a high-quality product. I don’t want to see the Firefox team lose credibility by releasing something that won’t go over well.

What browser do you use, and why? What makes it better than others in your mind? If you’re a Firefox fan, are you happy to wait a bit longer for the new versions?