Tag Archives: pixels

How to Adjust Screen Resolution in Windows


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Screen resolution refers to the size of the whole image that is displayed on your monitor. It specifically refers to the number of individual pixels that are shown at once. The more pixels on your screen the more detailed your images will be. With less pixels, the elements will look larger… but there will be a lot less space on the desktop for programs to run.

Your monitor has a native resolution – unless it’s an older model. Most LCD monitors these days can display a lot of different resolutions, but the native one always looks the best. This is because that is the resolution that matches the number of pixels inside of your display. Any other resolution might look a bit distorted since the number of pixels used won’t match the actual number in the display.

However, there are times when you may need to change your resolution to make it easier for you to see properly. Our monitors have an optimal resolution setting that works best for the monitor – but it may not work best for our eyes. Changing up the resolution is a pretty simple matter, thankfully. Before adjusting the resolution settings, make sure your display drivers and monitor drivers are up to date.

To change your resolution in Windows 7, right-click on your desktop and then choose “Screen Resolution.” You will find a drop-down menu next to the word “resolution,” showing you all of the different resolutions that your monitor can support. Further down on that same screen, you will see blue words: “Make text and other items larger or smaller.” Clicking here will help you quickly and permanently adjust your font and image size to meet your vision needs. Additionally, you can temporarily change text size on a page by holding down your CTRL key and scrolling the mouse wheel in or out.

Again on that same screen, clicking on the blue words “What display settings should I choose?” takes you to a Help topic which explains each of the changes you can make in detail. This page can help you make decisions on choosing color settings, brightness and contrast settings and more.

Microsoft has put together a fantastic tutorial to show you all of the ways you can customize your Windows 7 installation to meet your particular accessibility needs.

iPhone 4 Camera Test

As you already know, my iPhone 4 arrived today. After getting everything set up and synched, I had to test it out. I’ve already recorded some videos with it, made a few calls, sent a couple of texts and talked with my buddy David via FaceTime. The next test was taking photos. I take a LOT of pictures. Most of them are done indoors at various functions, or here in my home when my dogs are being more than adorable. Therefore, I tried a few indoor shots to see how they look. YOU tell ME – how awesome is this camera?

Still photo of my office:

iPhone 4 Photo Test1

Back camera shot of Wicket without using flash:

iPhone 4 Photo Test2

Back camera shot of Wicket using flash:

iPhone 4 Photo Test3

Another forkin’ iPhone 4 photo:

Another Forkin' iPhone 4 Photo

I can already tell you – I’m a happy Geek. How are the various tests going with your new iPhone 4?

8-Bit Creatures Have Invaded New York!

One More Production has done it again. Patrick Jean and his team’s latest short film, PIXELS, was shot on location in New York City.

The level of creativity in these video clips are nothing short of fantastic. This has to be one of my favorites, though. What Geek doesn’t love both 8-bit AND video games? I’m glad that @GapingVoid brought this to my attention.