How Do You Share Photos Across the Web?


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Yesterday, I bought some interesting things at the grocery store. I had to snap pictures and upload them through Instagram. This site gives you an interesting and unique way to share photos taken with your mobile device on the web in a simple manner. All you have to do is take your picture, select your preferred visual style through the presets and upload it to the web. By doing this, you can share your images across networks such as Twitter, Facebook and Flickr.

The problem is that until now there was no easy way to browse everyone’s images on the web. If you weren’t connected to a person in some way, you’d miss out on all the great shots they were sharing. With the introduction of Extragram, though, all of that is about to change.

Extragram uses Instagram’s API to create a new and simple way for people to browse through photos. Instead of relying on the mobile app or even direct links, you can log in and browse Instagram photos within your browser.

Yes, I did just take a picture of the Extragram logo to upload through my Instagram account. If you would like to follow me on the site, just search for my l0ckergn0me username and add me. I tend to take a lot of pictures… I’ll snap shots of silly thing, beautiful things and shiny things. I love to share bits and pieces of my life through photographs, and you never know what you’ll find each day.

The challenging part of using Instagram is choosing which filter to use for any given picture. You have to add exactly the right one to get your point across! Once you’ve done that, it’s time to finally share it out and let others discover what you’ve done through Extragram.

How do you share photos across the web?

Edit Images with Gimp


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Marques is back this week with a short review of his favorite image manipulation program – Gimp. Gimp is free cross-platform software that can help you complete a variety of image tasks with ease.

Gimp is a very powerful piece of software. Marques uses this program for all of his graphics on his site instead of using the expensive Photoshop software. You can do anything with Gimp that you can do with paid alternatives.

It is a raster editor, which means that it performs operations directly on the pixels that make up the image, and not a vector editor. Other (proprietary) raster editors include Adobe Photoshop, Jasc Paintshop Pro and the humble Microsoft Paint. An alternative free editor is the KOffice project, Krita. Users wanting to edit photographs will certainly want a raster editor like GIMP. Graphic designers and illustrators may prefer a vector editor depending on their tastes.

Gimp is a fantastic alternative to Photoshop or other titles you hear people raving over all of the time. It’s great for everyone from beginners up to experts and will be able to handle any project you can dream up.

Create a Flickr Photo Map on Your Apple Device

The Flickr Photo Map will drop photos onto your map instantly as you zoom and pan to your location. You can explore the world like you never have before. Check out your photos from anywhere on Earth. Scan through the sands of the deserts or hop across the various islands found in the Caribbean.

The app is simple to use. You can search through photos by Tag, Flickr Username, Text Description or Place. View your current location to see pictures others have taken nearby, or zoom to the country you’ve always wanted to visit. You’ll be able to imagine yourself relaxing at the places you wish you could be in. Pinch and scroll your way across any continent… any state… any city or remote location.

The Flickr Photo Map is optimized for the iPad, iPod touch and iPhone. Once you buy it, it will work on all of your devices. The photo stream is refreshed constantly, the moment you check out somewhere new. You can choose between road view, satellite view and hybrid! Checking out new locations has never been this much fun.

iPod touch Camera vs iPhone 4 Camera – Sample Photo / Still Image Test

After publishing my iPhone 4 vs iPod touch video test, I decided to take the still photo capabilities of each device for a spin. The differences were astonishing.

Despite comparing favorably to one another in the 720p video test, the same lenses produced substantially disparate still images – and I can’t say that I was anything but disappointed with the iPod touch 4th generation’s photo quality.

  • The iPhone 4’s photos, much like its videos, came out far more crisp. Even with ample light (outdoors or indoors) and proper focusing techniques, I could not produce a sharp image with the iPod touch.
  • The iPod touch is only capable of capturing 960×720 still images – inexplicably lower than its 1280×720 video resolution!
  • There is no flash on the iPod touch 4th generation devices.
  • The default camera app on the iPod touch 4th gen does not have an HDR feature.

Here are my original, untouched image samples (obviously, NOT at their native resolution). You’ll want to click through each one of the thumbnails to see the striking differences.

iPhone 4 – sharper digital zoom

iPod touch 4 – muddy with digital zooming

iPhone 4 – still photos have good field of view

iPod touch 4 – lacks sharpness

iPhone 4 – uneven white balance

iPod touch 4 – equally-as-uneven white balance

iPhone 4 – heavy details

iPod touch 4 – devoid of any detail

iPhone 4 – A little oversaturated, blue

iPod touch 4 – fairer image quality

Bottom line: if you’re going to buy an iPod touch for its camera, only plan on using it to record videos – not still photography. The iPhone 4 is still quite usable for either still photography or video.

Brew Your Pictures With Percolator

I have been having a great time using Percolator on my iPhone lately. You can use the app to turn any photo into a seriously cool multi-color mosaic. Open it up and mix up new color palettes for all of your designs… and add more style to your old typography. Create new patterns for your websites, page layouts or illustrations. Heck, you can even use this in conjunction with other photo apps. The only real limits to what you can come up with are the ones created by the rock sitting on your shoulders.

Percolator is simple to use. You can use the camera on your phone to take a new picture or load up something that is hiding in the camera roll. Zoom in and pan around to make SURE all of your details are exactly the way you want them. The Grind setting controls those details: “Coarse produces the biggest circles, while “Fine” gives you the smallest ones. Close cropping the photo will give you a larger and more detailed finished image. When you’re satisfied with what you’ve done, simply export it to the film roll as a JPEG file.

I’m not kidding when I tell you that once you start playing around in Percolator, you’ll never look at pictures in the same way again. Even if you aren’t a professional designer or photographer, you can easily create some off-the-hook stuff to share with the world. Heck, send me links to what you’ve done with this app. Perhaps one of you should start a special photo group for this stuff over on Geeks.