Tag Archives: PC-game

How to Design Your Own Video Game Fighting Moves


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If you ever challenge me to a fighting game, I’d likely not accept. I’m a button masher, in the hopes that I’ll accidentally come across the right moves. I’m not very good at the whole video game thing. If you’re interested in the whole fighting game genre – and want to create your own moves – you’ll be interested in this, for sure!

On Toribash, you create the violence. Toribash is an innovative fighting game where YOU design the moves! Earn credits by winning matches, then customize your character in the store! Trade items with other players. Win prizes in weekly tournaments.

The basic aim of the game is to fight the opponent, scoring points for damage. Some limbs break easier then others, others give more points when hit. To get more points, each joint can be relaxed, contracted, extended or held. This makes the game play very open-ended as there are no set moves, although many people will copy a move which seems to work well.

Toribash is a free download, and works on both Windows and OS X. I am pretty amazed at how easy and fun this is, even though I likely won’t get into it much. I’m just not a fighter! There’s a bit of a learning curve in creating the moves and styles, but you should get the hang of it pretty quickly.

I’d rather see you fighting via Toribash, and not in real life – so check it out today!

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Are OSs and Developers Ruining PC Gaming?

The following Email was sent to me recently from Intrepid. He brings up some very interesting points, and I wanted to pass them along. What’s your take? Leave me a follow up comment to this post, or send me an Email yourself to [email protected]lo.com. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

After reading an article about Epic moving to consoles rather than staying with PCs because of a lack of purchases in the PC gaming market, I got to thinking.

With consoles, programmers and graphic designers know what the system can handle. They know there is a set requirement as to what the hardware and software can take. Developers know where to “max out”, you could say, with graphics and what lines of code are unnecessary. There are no variables in the system hardware or whats running on the system, so they have a guideline to follow.

However, when it comes to PC gaming, are developers still pushing the limit, or are they trying to keep the content and overall graphics down so more consumers will be able to play? We see Crysis, and its insane hardware specs to run it on maximum settings, but what other developers are following suite? We know the majority of computers being purchased are coming packed with Vista, and that OEMs are throwing in the least amount of RAM as possible with the already memory hogging machine. What are you going to be able to play on that? If you’re lucky, you’ll be able to throw an emulator on there and pray its even compatible with your OS.

I’m beginning to learn why more and more consoles are being sold over gaming PC’s. When you buy a console and throw your game in, you know 99% of the time its going to work, unless of course you receive a defective system or disk. These can easily be replaced if need be, but ultimately, you know its going to work. With PCs, however, a consumer turns the box on its side and is exposed to a bunch of PC jargon they don’t understand. I wouldn’t be surprised if half of the consumers buying PC games from BestBuy, Target, etc. even know what a video card is! “How much RAM do you think I have”, is echoed through out stores everywhere. How is a sales rep supposed to answer that? Consumers just don’t know.

I just hope that OSs, *cough* Vista *cough* get their hardware compatibility in line if its going to get thrown out on every rig leaving stores. Also, I’m praying… praying, that developers will not begin to create games of horrible quality to enable it their software to be played on these horrid machines. Most developers may even leave PC gaming behind once they make a cross platform game such as Epic, and then notice the difference in sales.