Tag Archives: motorola

Motorola Xoom vs iPad: Which one Lost?

How do you know your product has failed?

When it’s sitting at the top of Woot – after Not Selling anywhere else. [EDIT: for the sake of Varun’s sanity, a very spirited commenter in the thread below, I amended this paragraph to help him better understand.]

I don’t know about you, but I hate buying something (new or used) only to know that it’s not going to be around (or supported) for much longer. Not to say that the Motorola Xoom tablet is a failure, but… normally, you wouldn’t find successes sitting in the digital equivalent of a bargain bin.

If you would still love to get your hands on this tablet computer, you’re better off looking for people who are more-than-willing to sell their remorse to you. I’m guessing you can get a Xoom for even less than what this web site is selling it for.

I might also mention that I’ve never touched a Motorola Xoom – but why would I? Why would you? Five years ago, the Xoom may have made for one interesting portable device. Five years ago.

And, for clarification’s sake: I have absolutely nothing against the Motorola Xoom for what it is! Unfortunately, it fell short of expectations in just about every way – and when you’re trying to compete with the iPad, you’d better have one amazing story to tell at a no-brainer price point.

Some people hate Apple so much that they’re trying to prove a point by buying something else. Stupid, but I guess it’s admirable. If you’re really itching to spend money on anything that isn’t an iPad at this point, you’re better off looking at HP’s TouchPad – if only because you know a single company is controlling the experience (hardware AND software).

I think it’s fair to say that the Xoom lost – but it didn’t go down without a fight!

Best of CES 2011: Motorola Atrix 4G


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You are about to witness a historic moment in the history of consumer electronics. Motorola unveils not only the most powerful smartphone yet based on Nvidia’s Tegra2 ARM Cortex-A9 processor, but has actually worked feverishly on making software layers on top of Android to provide for a Desktop/Laptop replacement experience, all powered by the phone!

Motorola presents full HD resolution Firefox web browser running on top of Android, Citrix virtualization integration for running all other x86 apps that can be virtualized, they put Android in a Window so you can still run any Android apps in that Window when in Desktop mode!

And this is the first generation of this type of product, so you are only witnessing the beginning of ARM Powered Pocketable Smart Mobile Devices to be able to power everything you would do on a Laptop powered by Intel/Microsoft. Expect even faster dual-core processors to run this type of product soon with unlimited amounts of tabs with lots of pictures/embedded videos and do it all fully smoothly.

This video was filmed by Charbax of ARMdevices at CES 2011.

Best Buy Reveals Droid 2 Pricing?

Best Buy has announced (sort-of) pricing for the long-awaited Droid 2: $199 with two-year service plan activation or $599 without. Engadget reader Greg (who lives in North Carolina) sent in photos taken at his local Best Buy. The leaked dummy units are on display in the store – complete with price tags.

There’s still no official word as to when the phone will go on sale, despite rumors of it happening on August 12th. The original Droid now appears to be “out of stock” on the Verizon website – adding even more fuel to the rumor fires surrounding the launch of this new model.

Verizon has allowed a LOT of information to be leaked regarding this as-yet unreleased phone. What better way to build momentum and gain free advertising, though? Over the weekend, a newspaper advertisement was also leaked, showing the Droid 2 going on sale very soon.

Are you salivating yet? Do you plan to grab one of these hot little devices as soon as they hit the market?

HTC, Motorola and Other Handset Companies Not Happy with Apple

During its already-infamous iPhone 4 conference on Friday, Apple CEO Steve Jobs claimed that antenna issues are native to “most phones.” He went on to specifically point to phones made by HTC, Motorola, Samsung, Nokia and RIM. It’s as though the tech giant is trying to make light of their design flaws by trying to paint a picture wherein all cellphones of the world have the same issues. According to the named manufacturers, though, this is NOT the case at all. These five companies all issued press releases today refuting the “facts” as Jobs outlined them.

Nokia wrote:

Antenna design is a complex subject and has been a core competence at Nokia for decades, across hundreds of phone models. Nokia was the pioneer in internal antennas; the Nokia 8810, launched in 1998, was the first commercial phone with this feature.

Nokia has invested thousands of man hours in studying human behavior, including how people hold their phones for calls, music playing, web browsing and so on. As you would expect from a company focused on connecting people, we prioritize antenna performance over physical design if they are ever in conflict.

In general, antenna performance of a mobile device/phone may be affected with a tight grip, depending on how the device is held. That’s why Nokia designs our phones to ensure acceptable performance in all real life cases, for example when the phone is held in either hand. Nokia has invested thousands of man hours in studying how people hold their phones and allows for this in designs, for example by having antennas both at the top and bottom of the phone and by careful selection of materials and their use in the mechanical design.

“Studying the way people hold their phones out in the field” – isn’t that an interesting concept? Apple themselves should have thought of this. This is something that needed to be thoroughly tested. You cannot tell me that it was and that they “didn’t know” how much of an issue this is. If they did, then we have a serious case of “we’ll do it our way anyway, and you’ll go along with it because we’re Apple.”

Research in Motion states:

Apple’s attempt to draw RIM into Apple’s self-made debacle is unacceptable. Apple’s claims about RIM products appear to be deliberate attempts to distort the public’s understanding of an antenna design issue and to deflect attention from Apple’s difficult situation. RIM is a global leader in antenna design and has been successfully designing industry-leading wireless data products with efficient and effective radio performance for over 20 years. During that time, RIM has avoided designs like the one Apple used in the iPhone 4 and instead has used innovative designs which reduce the risk for dropped calls, especially in areas of lower coverage. One thing is for certain, RIM’s customers don’t need to use a case for their BlackBerry smartphone to maintain proper connectivity. Apple clearly made certain design decisions and it should take responsibility for these decisions rather than trying to draw RIM and others into a situation that relates specifically to Apple.

Let’s repeat a small part of RIMs statement again: “Apple clearly made certain design decisions and it should take responsibility for these decisions.” I have to agree completely. If someone at Apple decided that we consumers wanted a thin phone rather than one whose antenna simply works, then they need to own up to that. If they believe they know what we want without asking us, they again need to step up to the plate.

The bottom line is that Apple needs to take ownership of this issue – and fast. People aren’t returning their iPhones in droves, no. However, by continuing this charade of “we didn’t do anything wrong,” they are starting to chip away at the sterling product reputation they once had. And, of course, they’re showing people that perhaps they really don’t care all that much when it comes to what we want and need.

New Motorola Droid X and Samsung Vibrant Full of Bloatware

Recently, we discussed bloatware found on computers. Bloatware includes all of the unnecessarily pre-installed programs that come with your shiny new machine. They take up space and sit there trying to entice you into using them. Over the years, we’ve hardened ourselves to this problem and simply start removing stuff as soon as we hook up our new toy. We shouldn’t have to do this, no. It’s just an annoying fact of life. Sadly, it seems as though many smartphones are now following in their big brother’s footsteps.

The Motorola Droid X and the Samsung Vibrant (both just released today) come with some bloatware apps pre-installed. The problem is, though, that most of them are NOT able to be removed. The Droid X, for instance, sports a Blockbuster video app and a demo for an Electronic Arts game called Need for Speed: Shift. The Blockbuster app includes a store locator and a place where you can download mobile movies from their catalog. You cannot uninstall this app from your phone – you can only remove it from your home screen. The game gives you limited functionality and a nice, big button urging you to buy the full version. This app can be removed, thankfully. Skype is included on the phone and is another permanent fixture. A strange new “feature” called City ID is also included. It gives location information about a phone number on your incoming call screen. It will only work for fifteen days, and then you’ll have to pony up about two bucks per month to use it.

The Vibrant is no less guilty of feeding us bloated apps we don’t need. You’ll find the Avatar movie on your phone, just in case you want to watch it over and over. One cannot help but wonder how much they paid to have that handily included. Another app is a video channel named MobiTV, which is only free for the first month. Third, you’ll find The Sims 3: Collector’s Edition. And last – but likely least – is an OLD version of Amazon’s Kindle app. None of these four applications can be removed from the device.

To me, this is ludicrous. I should have the ability to choose what programs and applications I want on my devices. If you want to pre-load something, so be it. I’m used to that. But you damn well need to give me the ability to get rid of whatever it is I don’t want. Do you agree with me – or not?

Motorola Backflip is Android for Social Media Simplicity


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If you want to sign up for a new AT&T plan right now, you can receive the new Motorola Backflip phone for just a penny. Why would you want to do that, though? Well, thankfully I was sent one of these awesome little phones to review. If you’re a social media fanatic, I think you’re going to like what Motorola has in store for you.

What makes this phone so good? It’s all about the integration – up front – of your social accounts. When I turned on the device for the first time, I was prompted to connect my various accounts. Once you’re logged in with your credentials, your account information and updates will be seamlessly pulled into the phone.

Out of the box, it really is a pretty good device compared to a lot of phones that are out there today. It’s built on the Android operating system, which will make some of you very happy. The phone has a physical backlit keyboard and supports WiFi. There are 350 minutes of talk time and 315 hours of standby time. It’s pre-loaded with assisted GPS.

You can change wallpapers and add folders. The keyboard is a bit bigger than many devices, which I know is important to some people. The touch screen isn’t extremely responsive, but you can flip it over to control it with buttons. Usint that button on the back is kind of wild, and very unique.

It’s super simple to connect all of your social accounts. To me, that’s what it’s all about: making it easy and fast to get – and keep – you connected.

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Motorola HS1001 Android Cordless Phone


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During the CeBIT conference, Motorola released the new HS1001 cordless home phone. Even though it’s a “land line” phone, it still packs Android that will connect to any Wi-Fi connectiong. You can use the 2.8-inch touch display on its back to not only call your friends, but also surf the web or check your email.

It comes with a speaker-equipped charging station, which lets you listen to your favorite tunes. It’s reported to be sold in the USA for about $150.00, and supports up to two hours of cordless phone calling on the battery. It even comes with a MicroSD card reader!

If you’re not ready to give up your land line, this may be the perfect phone for you!

This video was filmed by Charbax at CeBIT 2010 consumer electronics show in Hannover, Germany.

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An eReader That Looks Like a Big iPhone


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Shenzhen Million-E Culture Industrial Co. Ltd. is showing a new e-reader based on e-ink with built-in 3G, WiFi and even with resistive touch screens.

This video was filmed by Charbax during the CeBIT 2010 consumer electronics show in Hannover, Germany.

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Motorola Head-mounted Computer Gen.2 Kopin Golden-i


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Imagine walking around with a head-mounted 15″ display to view information available to you at all times. This system features a pretty cool six-axis position tracker from Hillcrest Labs that allows you to operate a cursor with nearly pixel-for-pixel accuracy by just moving around your head when for example panning around a large image or a map. There is a highly targeted microphone that understands voice-commands where you can for example zoom in on maps or images, you can exit back to the programs menu, launch specific applications and open specific files.

Here are the specs of this Second Generation Kopin Golden-i Motorola-branded Head-mounted Computer system:

  • Processor – TI OMAP3530 clocked at 600MHz
  • Display – Kopin SVGA (800 x 600) liquid crystal micro display (LCD)
  • User interface – Includes speech recognition and motion sensing
  • Other I/O – 1 x USB
  • Expansion – microSD slot
  • Power – 1200 mAh battery provides more than eight hours of operation
  • Operating system – Windows CE

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This video was filmed by Charbax from the Mobile World Congress 2010 in Barcelona.

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