Et Tu, Cloud? Caveat Clickor!

For the longest time, we knew where our data existed – it existed on our computers, typically on a hard drive or potentially a floppy disk. So now when we create files, let’s say on a Web service like Google Docs, for example, we may never actually know where that file sits. We know we can get to it from anywhere, of course, but it’s out there. In The Cloud. We don’t know the physical location of that file, but do we need to know, anymore? No, we don’t. That’s for someone else to worry about and track.

Our whole life is eventually going to be stored in The Cloud, no longer tied to a physical machine or hard drive. I’m not even really tracking any of my media, anymore. I have a Rhapsody account for my music; I subscribe to Netflix and Hulu. I’m not really buying any physical media, anymore. I’m not storing them on my local network. This data exists in The Cloud on these Web services that I pay to access. I know that, somewhere, the file is sitting on a hard drive waiting for me to point and click my way to it, but the responsibility of holding on to it is no longer mine.

Think of a public library – you can check out books, read them, and then put them back on its shelves without cluttering up your own at home. The archives are there for your benefit without requiring you to be their ever-vigilant custodian. The Cloud doesn’t charge you overdue fees, either, so don’t go saying the 21st century’s never done you any favors!

Storing your life remotely has its benefits, but as with any service that offers to simplify your day-to-day doings, be sure to research these places in The Cloud and make sure they’re reliable. Let your vision look toward The Cloud, but keep your head on Earth when you’re making the decision about what chunks of your life to stow away there.

The Other Mike from TechCrunch


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If you’re not following Mike Butcher on Twitter, you’re missing out! He writes for TechCrunch – but only for a specific part! Mike and I ran into each other at the [re]Think Hawaii conference recently, and had to talk about social media, and his take on things.

As I mentioned, Mike writes for TechCrunch. He started out writing only for TechCrunch UK, and has turned that into a gig writing for all of Europe and the surrounding areas. In Europe, Asia, and the like, everyone is spread out. Mike and his team work hard to bridge that gap, and bring you the latest news and information from everyone “across the pond”. They now have a total of 16 writers on board!

I asked Mike how he got his start in social media, or what drew him to it. He’s been writing about the Internet for many years, including for a magazine awhile back in London. He also worked for the American magazine Industry Standard quite awhile ago. After this, he began doing some freelance writing, and met Mike Arrington in London. He started talking with him, forged a relationsihp, and bam! Mike was off and running, writing for TechCrunch London.

For Mike, the Internet IS the office. That’s where he works, and where he lives. He feels that this is the new way of “doing journalism”. I have to agree with that, obviously!

He was drawn to the [re]Think Hawaii conference for several reasons. This conference had people from the US, China, and even Europe. It brought together a number of different personalities from all walks of life, and from every corner of social media and technology you can think of.

If you happen to run into Mike at a conference, take the time to talk with him. He’s a great guy, with excellent insights on the state of social media in Europe! Be sure you follow him on Twitter, as well.

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Mark Glaser and Jim Ray – Hacker Journalists at Gnomedex


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Why did media companies miss the boat on the web? They haven’t always valued the input from their own technology folks on staff. That’s changing as the web is becoming an important source for news and information. So now local newspapers, radio stations and TV stations are hoping that a new breed of “hacker journalists” can help them out by having experience in coding and also understanding journalism issues.

Mark Glaser is a longtime freelance journalist whose career includes columns on hip-hop, reviews of video games, travel stories, and humor columns that poked fun at the titans of technology. From 2001 to 2005, he wrote a weekly column for USC Annenberg School of Communication’s Online Journalism Review, and he still writes the OPA Intelligence Report email newsletter for the Online Publishers Association. Glaser has written essays for Harvard’s Nieman Reports and the website for the Yale Center for Globalization.

Glaser has written columns on the Internet and technology for the Los Angeles Times, CNET and HotWired, and has written features for the New York Times, Conde Nast Traveler, Entertainment Weekly, the San Jose Mercury News, and many other publications. He was the lead writer for the Industry Standard’s award-winning “Media Grok” daily email newsletter during the dot-com heyday, and was named a finalist for a 2004 Online Journalism Award in the Online Commentary category for his OJR column.

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Konnect


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I recently attended the WTIA Fast Pitch Forum & Technology Showcase. The conference featured two dozen of the of the hottest technology companies in Washington presenting their business in a competition for “Best In Show”. Konnect was one of the presenters. They are the only social media platform designed for local newspapers.

Konnects is a social media platform designed for online publications, magazines and newspapers to bring interactivity to your organization’s website. Their platform is easy to deploy and their solutions team can assist you in getting your online community up and running quickly.

Choose the colors, fonts, and banners to give your online newspaper community a unique look and feel that matches the branding of your organization. Each Konnects powered online community comes with its own email importers to allow your members to grow your audience base for you. As your community grows by word of mouth, so will your brand recognition, marketing opportunities, and ability to generate additional revenue.

If you are a part of an online news source, consider checking out Konnect. Don’t get left behind in the ever-changing world of the Internet… and the way we consume our news.

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Are Bloggers Journalists: Are Blogs New Journalism?

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Is blogging the new form of journalism? Should bloggers be held to the same standards as the media? Those questions were asked of me recently in an email, and raise a lot of food for thought.

I don’t know that I’d say blogging is a new form of journalism, no. Blogging is certainly a newer type of writing style. Blogging and journalism aren’t exactly the same, but they achieve the same results. A blogger writes out of passion, out of an extreme interest for a particular topic. Should a blogger then be held to the same standards as the media? I don’t think so, necessarily. I guess it depends on what your definition of a journalist is, as opposed to a blogger. The only difference I can see between the two is content. They’re both there to produce content. Bloggers write because they want to. Journalists write to get paid, because it is their job.

How many times have you had this happen? I’ll get a phone call from someone who wants to interview me, or include me in a story. They’ll take up a few hours of my time, asking tons of questions. Then, of course, they use only one thing I said or the story/comments aren’t used correctly. How many times have you been watching television, and the reporter just totally gets it wrong. You’re yelling at the TV, telling the person on the program that they are wrong! It happens all the time.

This is the main difference I see between bloggers and journalists. Bloggers tend to write what they know, think and feel. Journalists are supposed to give facts, and unfortunately don’t always get them correct.

In many ways, the Blogosphere is like this huge editorial board. If a blogger comes out with something excellent, it will spread like wildfire. It will be validated. Many people feel that bloggers should be held to the same standards as the media. But… what makes “the media?” Heck, I am the media as much as anyone else is. So who draws the line? Who decides what is journalism, and what is merely blogging? Who is the boss when it comes to standards for sets of people?

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