Tag Archives: kvm

How to Control Multiple Computers with Input Director


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When you have multiple machines to manage, it’s easier to use one mouse and keyboard. However, not many of us have found a KVM hardware switch that really works for us. This is where software such as Input Director can come in handy, and Dylan is going to show you how it works.

With Input Director, you can share a single keyboard/mouse across a set of systems. You switch which system receives the input either by hotkey or by moving the cursor so that it transitions from one screen to the other (in a very similar fashion to a multi-monitor setup). Input Director also supports a “shared” clipboard, in which you can copy data onto the clipboard on one system, transition across to another and paste.

Tell Input Director how your monitors are positioned simply by dragging them to the correct spot on the monitor grid. It’s that easy to get started!

Thanks, Dylan, for another excellent screencast.

What do You Treasure Most in Life?

I love how during my travels through our sites every day, I come across something that really makes me stop and think. Today’s post is found on Geeks, and it’s called What do You Treasure Most in Life. Not only did I have to stop and take time to think this through for myself, but I also am curious to see your answers. Reading through the thread, it’s heartening to see that many people place their family/kids/friends at the top of their lists. Too often, we let the material get in the way – or at least our quest for what’s tangible. Kat summed it up beautifully, reminding us:

Even with the economy in the toilet – we have much to be grateful for in life, and much to treasure. Don’t let a minute of life pass you by without remembering things like this.

We are seeing news articles daily about people taking their lives over losing their jobs, or falling far behind in their bills. Heck, we’re even reading about people who are taking the lives of others – including their own children. We hear of the layoffs, and many of you have been affected by them yourself. But when you take a moment to stop and really think – you are still blessed. You have family and friends who love you. You have your health (hopefully!) and mental well-being. You have your brain, and the ability to think, do and create. You have your freedom (in most countries). You have YOU.

While you’re thinking about your answer to the topic question, why not take a read through some of the other interesting things found today on Geeks and Lockergnome?

What do You use for a KVM Switch?


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Let’s say that you have a PC, but you don’t have a monitor, keyboard or mouse plugged into it. However, you do have a notebook computer sitting there with Windows on it, as well. You could use that notebook to run the PC with a KVM switch!

Not only are you saving energy by not running another monitor, you’re also saving space by not having another keyboard and mouse. Using a KVM switch is highly recommended for better productivity. You can use one keyboard, one mouse and one monitor for two different machines! I don’t think there’s an easier way to be efficient.

This is ideal for people who own a laptop and an older desktop PC and wish to keep using both for various functions or applications. The KVM features an on-screen toolbar with multiple functions such as file transfer, desktop image scaling and others. The built-in file transfer utility lets the user transfer files, presentations, business information and create backup copies between both computers or from external USB storage devices.

What’s interesting about this particular KVM is that it has an extra USB port built in. That allows you to plug in an external hard drive if you should need to! This is easy to use, and will allow you a ton of new-found freedom when managing your life. Keep and transfer files much faster using the IOGear Laptop KVM. All you need is open USB ports and Windows PCs and you’re ready to roll.

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VNC or Remote Desktop or What?

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My last caller for tonight was AfroThunder, another long-time member. He was wondering if I know of any KVM’s with USB support. There are several out there, but I’m unsure as to what brand may be better. You definitely want to get the most for your money. You have to keep in mind what kind of video it supports. I’m unsure of pricing, also. He plans to use the KVM to switch from the Notebook to the Desktop.

Instead of doing this, I wonder if he’s thought of using Win2VNC.

This program will let you use two screens on two different computers as if they were connected to the same computer. It even works between different operating systems.

If you have two or more computers on your desk and you are tired of having several keyboards and mice around to control them, this is the program for you. While running this program, you can move the mouse pointer beyond the right or left edge of your primary display and the pointer will appear on the other computer screen. If you have ever used x2x or a computer with two graphics cards, you know what I am talking about.

The program will open a small (one pixel wide) window on the edge of your screen. Moving the pointer into this window will trigger the program to take over your mouse and send mouse movements and keystrokes though the RFB protocol to a VNC server running on another machine. When the pointer is moved back towards the opposite edge on the other screen, the mouse is returned to your primary display.

The operation itself is almost identical to x2x, but most of the code was actually borrowed from the program vncviewer.

Win2VNC works with Windows 95/98/ME/NT/2000/XP. Note that if your secondary machine is running X-windows, you will need to use x0rfbserver rather than the regular Xvnc server to achieve the proper effect.

Win2VNC normally lives in the system tray and has a menu there that allows you to exit the program, send syskey events and save connection options.

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How to Access Your Computer Remotely with a VNC KVM

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I have a monitor hooked up to one MacBook Pro, the other monitor hooked up to my Vista desktop machine, and the other MacBook Pro all sitting on the desk here. I have ONE mouse, and ONE keyboard. Now… watch as I play around and move things on all three screens using that one little mouse.

No, I’m not using the Synergy software I had planned to use for this. It’s a pain to install and configure, and it wouldn’t even work. It hasn’t been updated since 2006, and didn’t want to work with Vista or Leopard. So again I turned to my chat room at live.pirillo.com to find an answer. iKteck, who is one of our chat moderators, suggested a totally free program called Win2Vnc. What’s that you said… FREE? I love free, so I went to check it out.

This little program is amazing. The primary machine needs to be a Windows machine. It acts as a VNC Viewer and will connect to any other machine where the VNC service is enabled and running. You cannot drag and drop things from one screen to another, no. To set it up, you simply need to tell the host machine which direction (N, S, E, W) the other machine(s) are from it, and then when you move your mouse in that direction, it will switch over to that machine/system. It can’t get any simpler than that. How it works:

The program will open a small (one pixel wide) window on the edge of your screen. Moving the pointer into this window will trigger the program to take over your mouse and send mouse movements and keystrokes though the RFB protocol to a VNC server running on another machine. When the pointer is moved back towards the opposite edge on the other screen, the mouse is returned to your primary display.

Now, this only works if the host machine is a Windows machine. When I make the final switch over to Leopard as my primary system, I will likely use Teleport at that time. It only works between Mac machines, which is all I will be using then anyway.

All in all, I have to say: Win2Vnc FTW. It’s an excellent program that just works… for free. It doesn’t get better than that.

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