Tag Archives: cloud

Are You Printing from the Google Cloud?


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All documents go to Heaven. In some instances, they head to the Cloud, instead. Google Cloud Print allows you to print to your printer of choice from any computer or smartphone – no matter where you happen to be. Simply activate the service connector within Google Chrome and your printer is automagically available to you from all Google Cloud Print enabled web and mobile apps.

This service is completely free. When running this for the first time, I was seriously impressed. It only takes a matter of seconds to send a job to the printer that I chose on my home network. I couldn’t believe how simple it truly was – and how seamlessly it worked.

You will need a Windows PC and one of the latest builds of Google Chrome in order to use the Cloud Print. This is the best implementation of network printing that I have seen in my entire life. One of the coolest features of the service is what happens to your document if your host computer or printer aren’t online at the time you choose to print from another device. The document job will wait patiently in the print queue – right in the Cloud. Your printer will download and print the job normally as soon as it it turned on.

You can connect as many printers as you wish to Google Cloud Print. If you accidentally delete any of them, it’s simple to re-add them the next time you log in. All print jobs are submitted over https, making them only available to you and the printer they are sent to.

Google keeps copies of the actual document only until they have finished printing. This is done to make sure that the job is actually completed. Once the job is complete, the document is deleted from Google’s servers – mostly. The company does keep information about print jobs such as the job title, the printer it was sent to and the printer status as a record. This is done in conjunction with your Google account id to allow you to view and edit your print history through the Cloud Print dashboard. The actual document contents are not saved.

Are you printing from the Google Cloud yet? How has your experience been with the service?

To the Cloud! [COMIC]

The slogan for Windows Cloud proclaims “To The Cloud!” The service claims to connect everything from your PC to the Cloud. Use it to create photos, documents and movies. Connect to the people and files you care about the most. Share what matters anywhere – anytime – easily. Doesn’t that give you warm, fuzzy feelings just thinking about it?

To the cloud! [COMIC]

There are many other services out there which can accomplish the same things. It’s getting tough these days to know which one may be “right” for you. How do you decide?

What is the Cloud?


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Over on Lockergnome, PhidiasBob was wondering what – exactly – IS Cloud computing. He’s also curious about how it works.

For the longest time, we knew where our data existed. It was typically found on our hard drive or even a floppy disk. When we create information in a service such as Google Docs these days, we don’t know what the physical location of the file is… it’s just out there – in the Cloud. We don’t even need to know where the files are located exactly. We just need them to be there whenever we want access to them.

One day, most of our life will be in the Cloud. Heck, I don’t even buy physical media anymore. I have a Rhapsody account. I have a Netflix account. Those files all exist somewhere… but they aren’t on MY drives. As long as I have my credentials, I can access that bit of my life. I don’t have to worry about tracking it anymore.

Services are doing the heavy lifting and hard work for you. You don’t have to worry as much about keeping track of things or making sure you have enough storage space. When we discuss the Cloud, we’re talking about the range of services that store our files and life for us. It can seem stressful, yes. Some people worry about their security and about handing over their important data to a third party.

Just because technology has gotten to a point that you can store all of your information remotely, you should still tread lightly. Do your research on services before you begin using them. See what others think, and make sure the company in question is reputable. Read your EULA! You’d be surprised what you might uncover there, honestly.

Hopefully this gives you a good idea as to what Cloud computing is all about – at least in general terms.

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Et Tu, Cloud? Caveat Clickor!

For the longest time, we knew where our data existed – it existed on our computers, typically on a hard drive or potentially a floppy disk. So now when we create files, let’s say on a Web service like Google Docs, for example, we may never actually know where that file sits. We know we can get to it from anywhere, of course, but it’s out there. In The Cloud. We don’t know the physical location of that file, but do we need to know, anymore? No, we don’t. That’s for someone else to worry about and track.

Our whole life is eventually going to be stored in The Cloud, no longer tied to a physical machine or hard drive. I’m not even really tracking any of my media, anymore. I have a Rhapsody account for my music; I subscribe to Netflix and Hulu. I’m not really buying any physical media, anymore. I’m not storing them on my local network. This data exists in The Cloud on these Web services that I pay to access. I know that, somewhere, the file is sitting on a hard drive waiting for me to point and click my way to it, but the responsibility of holding on to it is no longer mine.

Think of a public library – you can check out books, read them, and then put them back on its shelves without cluttering up your own at home. The archives are there for your benefit without requiring you to be their ever-vigilant custodian. The Cloud doesn’t charge you overdue fees, either, so don’t go saying the 21st century’s never done you any favors!

Storing your life remotely has its benefits, but as with any service that offers to simplify your day-to-day doings, be sure to research these places in The Cloud and make sure they’re reliable. Let your vision look toward The Cloud, but keep your head on Earth when you’re making the decision about what chunks of your life to stow away there.

People Want iTunes in the Cloud

Today, market research company NPD released their findings after surveying millions of iTunes users: we want to see iTunes moved to the cloud. About 25% of iTunes customers would be very interested in a paid-for streaming service that will allow them to access their content on any device. The number of those interested was nearly double when dangling a free service.

Between seven million and eight million iTunes users in the U.S. would have strong interest in one of the paid subscription options, according to the report. These consumers indicated a willingness to pay a minimum monthly fee of $10 — either for streaming music or access to their personal music libraries on multiple devices. NPD estimates that there are 50 million iTunes users in the U.S. According to NPD’s music industry research, a model that offers iTunes users free access to their own music libraries would attract in the range of 13 to 15 million subscribers.

If such a model supported multiple devices, NPD estimated that approximately 8 million iTunes supporters would be willing to pony up around ten bucks per month. As the firm points out, that’s a billion dollar market just in the first year alone. The market would explode growth-wise as more and more people begin to understand what “the Cloud” is.

At 25% of their userbase, Apple is looking at about 15 million people in the U.S. alone. Were they to capitalize on this, they could easily be raking in $80 million per month in revenue. The question is… will they jump at the chance any time soon? What are your thoughts?