Tag Archives: breast cancer

3D Mammography Approved by FDA

Cancer in any form is nasty business. I could sit here all day and write about the horrors of the disease, but I honestly don’t need to. You already know the destruction it causes, to the victim as well as to the family and friends who support them. The statistics are staggering, no matter which variation of this illness you’re researching. For women, the words breast cancer alone can send chills up and down the spine. Those particular numbers blew my mind when I looked them up for this article: on in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime… ONE. IN. EIGHT..

Aside from non-melanoma skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States. It is also one of the leading causes of cancer death among females. According to the CDC, 202,964 women in the US alone were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007 (the most recent numbers available), and 40,598 women in the US died from the disease. That’s 40,598 more than ever should have been lost.

Strides are made every day when it comes to detection, treatment and cures. Just Friday, the FDA approved a new 3D Mammography device – the first of its kind. The machines will generate 3-D images of the breast, potentially helping doctors spot more cancerous tumors – and smaller ones. After all, the sooner a tumor is found the better the odds are in the race to the cure.

“Physicians can now access this unique and innovative 3-D technology that could significantly enhance diagnosis and treatment approaches,” said Jeffrey Shuren, director of the FDA’s device division, in a statement.

I’ve written before about the Keep-a-Breast Campagin. This is just one of many fantastic organizations dedicated to helping fund research and to help patients. The reason I chose this particular one to support is those fun bracelets which are pictured above. What guy wouldn’t want to sport a tshirt or bracelet which say “I Love Boobies!” in public – and get away with it?

The foundation is dedicated to “helping eradicate breast cancer by exposing young people to methods of prevention, early detection and support. Through art events, educational programs and fundraising efforts, they seek to increase breast cancer awareness among young people so they are better equipped to make choices and develop habits that will benefit their long-term health and well-being.”

The purpose of Keep A Breast’s “I Love Boobies!” Campaign is to speak to young people in their own voice about a subject that is often scary and taboo. Sadly, there is a real need to do this: girls as young as TEN years old have been diagnosed with the disease. Although the incidence of breast cancer in young women is much lower than that of older women, young women’s breast cancers are generally more aggressive, diagnosed at a later stage, and result in lower survival rates. In fact, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in young women under the age of 40.

With tech advances such as the new 3D Mammography machine approved by the FDA and campaigns such as I Love Boobies!, we may finally one day be able to wipe out breast cancer for good.

Give the Gift of Keep a Breast

I knew that the title of this blog post (and the tweet I will send when it’s finished) would make you click! After all, what Geek guy doesn’t like boobies? What Geek girl doesn’t have boobies? If you’re here thinking you’re going to see some type of soft porn, though, you’re going to be highly disappointed. I simply want to talk with you a moment about the Keep-a-Breast Foundation.

My assistant Kat told me about this over the weekend, and I had to check it out. Her fifteen year old daughter begged her to buy a few “I Love Boobies!” bracelets for her and her friends. Kat was momentarily taken aback, of course, until the teen explained what they’re for. Not only did Kat buy the girls the bracelets, she also bought a bumper sticker for herself.

The Keep A Breast Foundation is a 501 {c} (3) non-profit organization. Our mission is to help eradicate breast cancer by exposing young people to methods of prevention, early detection and support. Through art events, educational programs and fund-raising efforts, we seek to increase breast cancer awareness among young people so they are better equipped to make choices and develop habits that will benefit their long-term health and well-being.

The bracelets, tee-shirts and stickers are fun. They’re also a great conversation starter. When someone asks you about your “I LOVE BOOBIES” gear, you can help the millions of women afflicted by passing on the link (or store name).

The Zumiez team just finished up a “Couch Tour” across the country right now in conjunction with the I Love Boobies campaign. You can follow their adventures on Facebook or Twitter. Their theme was “Imagine If…” – asking people to imagine a world with no Cancer, no homelessness and no poverty.

Join the Zumiez team in helping to eradicate Breast Cancer. Grab a bracelet, sticker or tee for yourself and show the world how much you love boobies!

Pink Friday

Two companies are turning “Black Friday” Pink. CompUSA and TigerDirect are doing an event this Friday, Nov. 28 to brand the day as “Pink Friday” for the second year in a row. They expect to raise more than $250,000 from a portion of total sales and from customer donations to Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the world’s largest breast cancer organization. They are partnering with Ustream to deliver a live stream of the event. They will have the live stream on all the TVs in their stores, as well as on CompUSA and TigerDirect’s website, as well as on Ustream.

CompUSA and TigerDirect wanted to see if I would be interested in recording a quick video clip to say hi, put in a few words about the cause, and acknowledge the efforts to raise money for breast
cancer / Susan G. Komen for the Cure. I might even participate live on Friday, too.

The good news? CompUSA and TigerDirect are willing to make contributions to Susan G. Komen in our names for $5,000 since I’m participating (our names = those of you who subscribe to my RSS feed, podcast, YouTube channel, Twitter posts, etc.). So, thanks guys… for helping make this happen (as opposed to the way I said it in the video, as “help making this happen”).