Tag Archives: android

Acer Stream: New 3.7" 1 GHz Android Phone


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Acer is launching this new 3.7″ Qualcomm Android 2.1 phone with the new customized Acer user interface layer on top of Android. The build quality of this phone is solid and the screen is fabulous according to all reports. Viewing angles on the AMOLED panel are pretty sweet. The 1GHz Snapdragon CPU handles transitions quickly and easily. The phone is a tad lighter than many other touch-screen devices.

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10" capacitive Android Tablet by Malata


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This tablet has a nice design; it’s compact and light for a 10″ capacitive Android tablet. It comes with a HDMI output for 1080p video output, USB host ports, and is based on the ARM Cortex A9-based Nvidia Tegra 2 processor.

The SMB-A1011 features a 10.1 inch capacitive 1024 x 600 multitouch screen. There’s 512MB/1GB SLC or 2GB to 32GB iNand storage. You’ll find 512MB (up to 1 GB) DDR2 memory, a mini USB, mini HDMI, audio in and out, speakers, a microSD card slot and an accelerometer inside this tiny little device. It weighs less than 1 1/2 pounds, and measure only approximately 10 x 6.5 x .5 inches.

This video was filmed by Charbax at Computex 2010 in Taipei Taiwan.

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Android One-Second Boot


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Android usually takes about 30 seconds to boot. Ubiquitous, somehow, has made their QuickBoot solution to work for the Freescale i.MX51 processor, where Android can boot in about 1 second. In this video, a full Android OS is demonstrated booting from complete power off in about 1 second.

QuickBoot doesn’t actually “boot” the operating system. It is simply achieving a faster restoration of a running OS image. It’s said that QuickBoot achieves the fast operation by restoring memory areas necessary for restart. It restores necessary parts of the memory image by figuring out the priorities of memory usage for the system. The restart time isn’t dependent on the amount of memory used by the OS. This is due to the fact that memory areas are read sequentially. This doesn’t really affect user operations.

QuickBoot is offered in the form of a software development kit provided for developers at OEMs and ODMs. The SDK is said to include a QuickBoot snapshot script and snapshot driver, which together are used to store snapshots of a RAM image to nonvolatile memory.

This video was filmed by Charbax at Computex 2010 in Taipei Taiwan.

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How Patent Wars Work


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Apple and HTC are locked in a patent infringement lawsuit. The actual legal complaints blatantly list 20 infractions that Apple feels HTC has made pertaining directly to Android devices. A caller to the live show the other night asked my thoughts on the situation, and on patents in general.

Holding a patent is your way of holding on to insurance. It’s not so much that you’d want to enforce it – it’s that you can use it as leverage. It’s basically a weapon in a peeing contest. Right now, some companies can’t do certain things because of patents. Their hands are completely tied. What is likely to happen is that Apple will allow HTC to do certain things, and HTC will reciprocate to Apple by allowing them to do other things.

At this stage in the game, I feel that Android is closer to a Windows Mobile phone than an Apple device. They certainly have a lot more promise. I think that the newest iteration of the Windows Mobile platform will be a shot in the arm… it will help get them back into the game.

But the whole “Android vs iPhone” debate is bunk. There’s nothing like the iPhone. They aren’t in direct competition with each other, because they are completely different. Apple controls everything about their operating system, while Google keeps things as open as possible. It’s like comparing apples and oranges.

With HTC, Apple could possibly be going after them because HTC has something they want in return for allowing the use of their patents. There’s really no way to know for certain from our standpoint. I’m an outsider, much as you are. That’s usually how these things come about though. The patent dance is a very intricate one.

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Ustream Viewer Beta for Android

Not long ago, we announced the iPad app for our live stream. Steve (Granit in our chat room) developed this app that will allow you to see the video AND the chat room right on your iPad screen – without having to click between them. You’ll be able to private message other users if you choose, and have moderation options available if you’re a channel operator. Additionally, if you click on a link within the IRC channel, it will open a browser window right inside of the app.

AndroidAdvocate is apparently disappointed to see there is not yet an alternative for those of you who are rocking with Android on your cell phone. His solution is to use the Ustream Viewer Beta, which is found on the Marketplace.

According to the Ustream blog, this is their second application for this platform. Their Broadcaster app was released last year. It enables users to stream live from their phones on 3G or Wi-Fi. The Android Viewer provides chat functionality, and when combined with the Broadcaster application… “it allows the first mobile-to-mobile functionality available on the Market.”

When the Viewer was released in November, it was done so in conjunction with a live KISS concert that was aired over Ustream. Viewer may only allow you to watch live video feeds, but it does so flawlessly. Use it to watch anyone’s live feed – from red carpet productions to puppies to my humble little show – while you’re on the go.

Ustream launched the iPhone version of the viewing app last January, when it was downloaded a whopping 113,000 times in 24 hours. It’s worth pointing out that the iPhone doesn’t have a Broadcaster app, because Apple won’t approve them. Could this give Android a small – yet important – leg up over the iPhone os?

Twitter for Android

A few weeks ago, the Twitter team announced that we would be seeing a Twitter client coming soon to Android devices. The app has become available sooner than we thought, as announced on the official Twitter blog today. “When apps work well with each other, sharing becomes as second nature on machines as it does in person. The Android platform is really good at that, and we’ve worked with the Android team to make it super easy to share what’s happening.”

The app makes it easy to stay connected. You can access your timeline by using the home screen widget. Check out a friend’s location on a map in seconds. Or, you can see your contacts’ latest messages in your address book, GoogleTalk list or any other app that uses the Android QuickContact bar. You don’t have to click through twelve different screens to find out what’s happening at any given moment.

Likely the best part of this news is the fact that the entire code will be open-sourced in the near future: “We had a great time working with the Android team and are thrilled that Google will be open sourcing the code used in this app in the near future. We look forward to the amazing experiences developers will create using Twitter APIs in their upcoming Android apps.”

This could bring some seriously cool apps from many talented developers. I know we have a few of you in our community already working on creating Android apps. What are your thoughts about the Twitter app? What do you think can be done to make it even better than it already appears to be out of the gate?

How to Add More Music to Your iPod or iPhone

If you’re a music fanatic, I bet you’ve griped many times about the lack of space for tunes on your Apple device. With the release of the new version of iTunes today, those rants will hopefully be relegated to the past. Apple has added a feature to reduce the size of the music files on your iPod or iPhone by converting the bit rate to 128 kbps. Most of you will never notice a difference in the quality of what you’re hearing when playing back your selections.

Install the update and begin your sync. Make sure to check “Convert higher bit rate songs to 128 kbps AAC” when you plug in your device. The sync will take longer than usual, because the application will need to convert all of the media to the new specification. You will be rewarded for the wait, though. Your iPhone or iPod will now be able to hold up to twice as many individual tracks as before.

This feature has been available on the iPod Shuffle for a while now, and many of us are happy to see that it has been extended to other popular Apple gadgets. Keep in mind that your original files in iTunes will not change. They will still have the same high quality as they had prior to the changes on the device.

What tech developments have come to your attention today? If you have anything to pass on that we may have missed on this blog, feel free to drop us a line.

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Fliptop Makes RSS Feeds Work for You

Fliptop was introduced at the DEMO conference this week in Florida. This application will make you sit up and take notice. You may even gasp loudly, and trip over your fingers in your rush to grab this for yourself. RSS feeds can be a pain to manage – we all know this. Additionally, normal RSS feeds only offer you a direct feed that you have to add to a reader of some sort.

Fliptop has several interesting features that normal RSS feeds do not. The application gives you the ability to filter content by keyword, follow only certain topics or categories that interest you, and allows you to receive email digests of only the things you want to see. The service is available in two different styles. One is designed with website owners in mind. The other, of course, is geared towards the users who visit those sites.

The interface for site owners will give you a button to embed on your site. When clicked, the button will ask the user which topics they want to follow. Below that there is the option to also filter by keywords. The user then chooses how they wish to be alerted to new content: via traditional RSS feed, email, Twitter, Facebook, or text message. If you want to receive email updates, you can also tell the application how often you want to hear from them.

After reading all about Fliptop, I can admit that I will be tripping over my own fingers very soon in my rush. What about you? How fast will you be typing this into your favorite search engine?

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Should School be Taught in the Cloud?

On March 5th, the U.S. Department of Education released its National Educational Technology Plan, which they named Transforming Education: Learning Powered by Technology. Some of the recommendations made in the report include things like having a computing device for every teacher – and student – so that they can access the Internet from both school and home, as well as wanting schools to embrace cloud computing, Creative Commons and open-source technologies.

The report focuses on what they are calling “21st Century Computing”. As a way to transform education, the department states that the plan is to “engage and empower learning experiences for all learners… by leveraging the power of technology to provide personalized learning instead of a one-size-fits all curriculum.” Overall, the plan calls for a challenge to the normal model of having an isolated teacher in every class. Instead, they want to promote the ideas of “always on” learning tools, with online communities for the teachers and students.

I know that this plan cannot possibly be enacted in schools across the country overnight. However, I’m excited to see things moving in this direction finally. What do you think? Is this a massive step forward for education in the United States?

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$65 Laptop


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Firstview Electronic HK Limited is showing what may be one of the worlds cheapest laptops. It runs Android on a low cost and low power VIA 8505 ARM based 533Mhz processor. It has 128MB RAM, 2GB Nand flash, 7″ 800×480 screen, WiFi, SD card reader, and 3G dongle support. It’s supposed to run 4 hours on a 2100mah battery.

It loads websites slower than a more expensive computer, but it can be made for only $65 in the Chinese factories when ordered by big resellers in large quantities. Therefore, this may work well for a backup, secondary or travel laptop.

This video was filmed by Charbax during the CeBIT 2010 Consumer Electronics show in Hanover, Germany.

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