Tag Archives: android

7″ Android Tablet – Aigo N700


Add to iTunes | Add to YouTube | Add to Google | RSS Feed

Aigo is a Chinese company who has been making portable media players for a while and now they are doing this capacitive 7″ Android tablet, it’s powered by Qualcomm MSM7627 ARM11 processor, comes with built-in 3G CDMA modem for around $450 unlocked retail price. So it is cheaper than the Samsung Galaxy Tab, but it’s also using a cheaper 600mhz ARM11 processor.

This video was filmed by Charbax of ARMdevices at CES 2011.

Upcoming Android Additions

Mog is a premium music service that lets you pay $10 a month to stream an unlimited number of songs to your computer and your mobile devices. The service will even let you download entire albums to your phone and save them. Ustream is a service which allows you to view live video streams – or stream a show of your own with just a few mouse clicks. The two companies do very different things, but they have one very important thing in common as of today: both will be automatically bundled onto 4G Verizon Android devices.

MOG will also be featured in Verizon’s V CAST app store, and users will be able to sign up for MOG accounts using Verizon carrier billing. By utilizing carrier billing, the companies are betting that more people will want to sign up for the service, since they won’t have to whip out their credit cards yet again. Additionally, having it bundled on the phone automatically will help make sure people use it… what better way is there to test out just how good that 4G connection really is than by downloading an entire music album with it?

The Ustream application will let you both broadcast and view live video streams. There will be integrated chat and social network integration for posting your videos to Facebook and Twitter. This will mean more exposure than ever for Ustream, a move that the company hopes will gain them more users. In a world of tough competition with other streaming applications, Ustream needs every advantage they can get. Making it simple to use on every Verizon 4G Android device is a great way to get a leg up on other similar services.

What are your thoughts? If you are a potential customer, are you happy to see these applications being included on your device without your asking for them?

Android Text Message Bug

The newly discovered SMS bug in Android sure makes “Antennagate” look like it was much ado about nothing. This interesting little snafu will have you sending messages to the wrong contacts. Think about it for a moment – this could be disastrous, depending on who your intended message ends up going to. This issue has been going on for about six months already, so why are we just hearing about it?

On the Android Developer’s Forum, this issue is rated as “Priority – Medium.” MEDIUM? Seriously? Let’s say you called off of work today and want to brag to your BFF about it – but your Android device wings the message to your boss, instead. How fun would that be? I can only imagine all sorts of scenarios in which this wouldn’t be good.

The problem is perhaps not only limited to Android, though. My assistant Kat is a proud iPhone 4 user, and tells me that she’s had this happen on her phone at times, as well… both with the 4th gen and the 3GS she had up until late October. Could this issue be something that just sometimes happens on all operating systems?

This is a very serious issue that Google seems to have been ignoring for the past six months. For a flagship mobile OS capturing such a big market in such a short space of time, this reluctance to acknowledge and fix such a critical issue reflects badly on Google’s stewardship of the Android platform.

Have you ever had this occur on your device? What phone and operating system are you using? Has anyone been able to help resolve the problem?

Do You Want the Android Mascot?

How cute is this little guy? Even if you’re not an Android fan, I’m willing to bet you wouldn’t mind having one of these. The Android “guy” is cool, no matter what operating system or device you prefer.

Who wants this Android action figure?

“The term mascot – defined as a term for any person, animal, or object thought to bring luck – colloquially (informally) includes anything used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team, society, military unit, or brand name.” These items and characters tend to be an important part of a company. Take this little Android guy – you see him somewhere, and you just know who he represents. And yes, there are people out there who are loyal to a product simply because they fell in love with the mascot.

You may be wondering if your company needs a mascot. I’d venture to say a definite YES! What better way to have people able to easily identify you and your product or service? When we see that cereal-stealing rabbit anywhere, we know he represents Trix. We grow up knowing these characters before we even understand their role in our society. It’s not only products aimed at kids which can be identified this way. Pay attention to commercials on television: everyone from the insurance agent to the gas station has a mascot.

You still have to have a great product and excellent customer service. But having a way for people to recognize you at a glance is another step in the process to gaining the recognition your company badly needs. Knowing who you are helps give potential customers a sense of security and trust in connection with your brand. Being able to say “ah yeah, that’s Company X” each time they see your mascot builds their confidence in the relationship.

How Many Windows Phone 7 Devices Have Been Sold?

Microsoft is finally talking hard numbers. According to the company earlier today, they have sold about 1.5 million devices – but not to consumers. The announcement notes that there have been 1.5 million phone manufacturer sales: in other words, “phones being bought and stocked by mobile operators and retailers on their way to customers.” The number of units sold tell a story, to be sure. What we aren’t being told is how many of those devices are being activated.

Apple and Google routinely talk about how many phones are being activated. Reportedly, there are around 300,000 Android activations every day and even more new iPhone customers. Those numbers boggle the mind, and leaves us to wonder – who the heck is activating Windows Phone 7 devices? The report shows us how many devices have been purchased by people – including those used to stock the shelves in the stores. In my opinion, that’s trying to put a positive spin on what should technically be a dismal report.

If Microsoft truly wants to be a player, they need to stop beating around the bush. Tell us how many devices are being activated. If they aren’t happy with that number, then they need to look at why things are going in the direction they are. The handsets and operating system are both solid. What’s holding them back? Could there still be that much stigma surrounding the company when it comes to the mobile market? Perhaps they need to come up with a new game plan to get these phones into the hands of real people who will give them a fair and unbiased opinion.

What are your thoughts? I don’t want to hear from Microsoft haters or Apple (or Android!) fanboys. I want to know WHY you feel Windows Phone 7 isn’t selling as well as the folks in Redmond had hoped. Please don’t just use the tired argument of “Microsoft sucks,” because that isn’t going to help anyone. Let’s hear what you honestly think, and perhaps together we can all come up with some fresh ideas.

Do You Rely on Your Phone?


Add to iTunes | Add to YouTube | Add to Google | RSS Feed

Someone asked recently if I could live without my cell phone. Ten years ago, I could have. Back then, my phone wasn’t smart at all. It was big. It had a lot of buttons on it. But it didn’t really DO much.

These days, my smartphone has turned into the best computer I’ve ever had. It’s with me anytime I leave the room, let alone the house. I don’t (and can’t) always carry my iPad or laptop with me. I certainly don’t haul my desktop around. My phone is always in my pocket and I can use it to do nearly anything I can do with the other devices.

My phone allows me to stay better connected with the world around me. I’m able to do most of what I need to do from wherever I am – I’m even always online. This is a more powerful computer than what I had back in high school. I don’t need a physical keyboard or mouse for a device to be a computer. It’s a basic input/output device. That’s all I need.

I don’t know if – today – I could live without my phone. I truly don’t think I could. How about you? Could you live without your phone?

Which Android Tablet Should You Buy?


Add to iTunes | Add to YouTube | Add to Google | RSS Feed

Someone recently asked me which Android tablet I feel is the “best.” I admit to not having much experience with Android tablets as of yet. What experience I have had has been okay. They’re functional, and they work.

However, I feel that they will really start to get interesting (and become more viable) once Google releases the Gingerbread update. This is when Google will be optimizing the Android system specifically for larger-screen devices. This optimization hasn’t yet happened at the software layer. It doesn’t matter if you have widgets and ports and other doo-dads.

When the software has been optimized for tablets, then I will likely pay a lot more attention to Android tablet devices. Until then – they’re nice toys.

Want to embed this video on your own site, blog, or forum? Download the video!

How to Grill a Phone

How fire-resistant is your cellphone? If you’re the owner of an HTC Surround Windows Phone 7 device, you’ll be happy to know that your phone will last longer in direct heat than either the iPhone or the T-Mobile G2 running Android.

In a rather interesting marketing campaign for EZ-Grill, the company decided to fry up three different cell phones. You have to admit that the strategy is a good one, even if you find it a waste of good devices. After all, you watched the video and took the time to form an opinion of it, right?

What other types of online marketing campaigns have you seen lately that are close to crossing a line between what you feel is right and wrong?

What Smartphone Do Real Men Use?


Add to iTunes | Add to YouTube | Add to Google | RSS Feed

Wired reported that American Special Forces favor the Google Phone, vs. the Army who designs their own hardware/software. They like the fact that it’s an open source option, which means that they can customize it to their liking, vs. spending extra money/resources on designing something from scratch. These devices will assist soldiers with vital communications while on the field.

Lamarr wants to know if he uses a Blackberry or iPhone if that makes him a “girly man.” Just because he orders a light salad on the side with every meal does not make him less manly!

US Special Forces were looking for a simple communications platform to use with their soldiers. They wanted something that was highly customizable and configurable, so they chose Android. They asked coders to develop a suite of applications that soldiers can use in the field.

This is going to be called the Tactical Situational Awareness Application Suite. This includes files transfers, video displays, multi-touch white-boarding and even live chat.

What do you think about this? Can we trust the open source community with this? Would it be a security risk?

Want to embed this video on your own site, blog, or forum? Use this code:

iPads and Androids Can Get Along


Add to iTunes | Add to YouTube | Add to Google | RSS Feed

Connecting an Android device (by way of hot spot) to an iPad is an excellent solution if you don’t want to use the built-in 3G connection. One caller to the live stream recently asked if I felt it would be faster to stop using his Android device, and simply connect to the Internet using the 3G provided on the iPad. There’s honestly no cut-and-dried answer to this.

Either solution will work, of course, and both will depend on how strong of a connection/signal you can find. When my Dad was deciding whether to get his new iPhone, he was also considering an Android device. He wasn’t sure what type of connection would be the best.

As long as you’re already paying for the service on the Android device, why not stick with that? When what you have is working, there’s nothing to fix or change. I think it’s an excellent option to have a mobile device that can be used as a hot spot.

Want to embed this video on your own site, blog, or forum? Use this code or download the video: