MacBook Pro 15″ with Retina Display Review

MacBook Pro 15″ Review: 7 Things I Like

  • It’s a portable workhorse – I use it for video, primarily
  • The display is everything I’d want it to be
  • The screen sits firmly in place – not much wobble in use
  • It processes videos faster with every Final Cut Pro X revision
  • Keyboard is same as wireless keyboard – muscle memory
  • Plenty of accessible ports for me
  • A logo isn’t screaming at me when I use it

MacBook Pro 15″ Review: 7 Things I Don’t Like

  • UI rendering isn’t as snappy as I’d like it in OS X Yosemite
  • The chassis gets dirty easily
  • The screen gets inexplicably crapped-up regularly
  • The built in FaceTime camera is only 720p, horrid low light perf
  • The built-in mic picks up fan noise
  • The HDMI port is output only, not input
  • Clean design, but not readily (or easily) upgraded

Windows 10 Potential Gotchas

I think that if you’re going to use Windows 10 on a regular basis (or at all), you owe it to yourself to read up on a few new aspects and features of the OS:

I used the word “potential” intentionally – as it carries double-meaning in this context. Windows 10 has the potential to either elevate or further sideline Microsoft Windows – and I’m also highlighting potential snags to those who blindly agree to Windows 10’s terms without understanding the consequences (or don’t perceive these features as “gotchas”).

Either way, Windows 10 is full of potential.

Hat tip to a top patron Steve Mannering for the link to better deconstruct Microsoft’s updated privacy policy for Windows 10.

iMac with Retina 5K Display Review

iMac with Retina 5K Display Review: 7 Things I Like

  • Every detail is sharper, even when zoomed in a bit or scaled up
  • Future-proofed with 4Ghz Intel Core i7, 32 GB 1600 MHz DDR3, AMD Radeon R9 M295X
  • The 1TB SSD is ample for my needs
  • Plenty of space on the screen to eliminate need for second monitor
  • Clean design: front, back, side – all around, well done
  • Ability to run Windows side-by-side (or within, thanks to Parallels)
  • For my average needs, it’s just as powerful as a Mac Pro
  • Giving one away at http://deals.lockergnome.com/

iMac with Retina 5K Display Review: 7 Things I Don’t Like

  • Speed bump over Mac Pro 2008, hardly perceivable in software yet
  • Apple logo in front – I know it’s an iMac, you put your logo on the back
  • The 720p webcam seems to be in radical need of an update
  • The fan kicks in quickly when watching video, especially in Chrome or Flash
  • USB 3.0 ports already seem outdated with USB Type C around the corner
  • Unless something changes, this is my primary Mac desktop for another 4 years
  • I still feel a need to plug in an external mic for all recordings
  • Giving one away at http://deals.lockergnome.com/

iPad is Not Failing

iPad sales are flat, but just because more and more people aren’t buying a new iPad is not indicative of a failure on Apple’s part.

Quite the opposite.

People seem to be quite content with their old(er) iPads. They’re likely not seeing the value in buying a new one if the old one is serving their needs. In many ways, users may be treating iPad like it’s a classic PC – not expecting to upgrade this computer until it breaks.

People continue to use iPad as a PC replacement, too – including buying items through Apple and generating revenue for the company in tow.

How is that anywhere near a failure?

Yes, the onus is still on Apple to drive value (and revenue) through hardware improvements, but even when it can’t sell a user the latest iteration… at least that person is probably happy with their current iPad.

I don’t think a happy user could be categorized in the “failure” column. If anything, Apple needs to further adjust its expectations and create more value in services, software, and ecosystem to compensate accordingly.

Can Windows 10 Save the PC?

TL;DR: Yes.

You know me (or should know me): I suck at the maths. I also understand that statistics can be twisted to accommodate any view.

So, I always take these kinds of industry updates with a grain of salt.

No doubt, an average user doesn’t need the PC as much as the PC needs a user today – and if you don’t understand that, then you fail to understand where consumer technology is (and where it’s headed).

If anything, our definition of what a PC is (and what it is not) needs to evolve – just like the value prop for Microsoft Windows needs to evolve.

Indeed, Microsoft is pushing the ball forward with the pending release (and promise) of Windows 10. In using recent Insider builds, I’ve been surprised at both performance and usability in various modes – and remain hopeful that existing cruft will continue to be cleaned up with incremental updates.

But what about the PC? Can Windows 10 save it with the Save button that’s represented by a product that isn’t actively used by most users today?

Let’s change the Save icon from a floppy disk (?!) to something else and expect that people are going to be okay with the change – or, we can keep the Save icon as a floppy disk (?!) and make sure that our existing users don’t lose their calm.

That’s the riddle Microsoft is actively trying to solve.

For Microsoft Windows 10 to succeed, it has to push past the classic PC paradigm – and, in doing so, can “save” the PC for the average user. We have to be shown that Windows isn’t just for the “computer room” anymore.

The desktop and laptop will still continue to have a place in this world for professionals (which is a term, by the way, I believe also includes those who live for modding or playing video games as though their life depended on it).

Windows 10 will give Microsoft an opportunity to better bridge the gap between yesterday and tomorrow – recognizing that simplicity and interconnectivity are paramount as the industry moves forward.

You simply can’t expect the PC’s design (as we’ve used it and known it for decades) is going to be able to make the transition, however. No product from any company could surmount this monumental change in modality.

I do, however, believe that Microsoft’s effort with Windows 10 can help change the perception of what a PC is (and can be).

If It’s Not an iPhone, It’s Not an iPhone

Apple’s new iPhone ad is making waves – some like it, some don’t.

I guess I’m ambivalent?

They’re telling the truth.

Which, I suppose, is rather outlandish for an ad.

At least, that’s what we’ve come to expect from ads: lies, overgeneralization, mistruths.

They’re speaking less about the iPhone and more about the phones that have been iPhone’esque. If you want an iPhone experience, get the iPhone.

In 2001, I remember being pulled into one of the first Pocket PCs I held. It was everything my Palm device was not. I wound up getting pulled away, however, when I found a third-party Palm OS device that offered “more” than my current Pocket PC. I spent every waking moment trying to get that Palm OS device to work more like my previous Pocket PC.

Then I realized: if I want this Palm OS device to be more like a Pocket PC (or something more like Windows Mobile), why wasn’t I just using a Pocket PC outright (or something running Windows Mobile)?

So, I went back to the world of Microsoft and was happier for it – until the first iPhone was released, that is.

Apple does offer something that other players do not – a value that (I’ve argued) continues to help make it stand out in the field. Most users don’t know why that’s valuable outright, and Apple is trying to communicate that clearly with the “part” language used in this commercial.

This commercial doesn’t mean squat to someone who already gets it – but it’s going to get someone like my parents thinking differently instead of assuming that an iPhone is exactly like the unending array of Android devices available today.

By telling the truth.

Imagine that.

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