No Kids Meal Toys in Fattening Fare

Santa Clara County out in California has announced that they will now regulate what kids meals are allowed to give away toys in the hopes that your children will become healthier. Any meal which has more than 485 calories, 600 milligrams of sodium will no longer be allowed to offer a toy along with dinner. Additionally, if the meal has more than 35 percent of calories from fat or more than 10 percent of calories from added sugar, the toy ban will be imposed.

County Supervisor Ken Yeager says that the new ordinance will “prevent restaurants from preying on children’s love of toys to peddle high-calorie, high-fat, high-sodium kids’ meals.” This, of course, rules out those super-awesome Happy Meal toys that every child crave. Can you imagine where the world would be right now if we had never had the Beanie Baby craze several years ago? I shudder to think about it, honestly.

While I applaud the fact that the county wants to promote healthy eating, I cannot help but think there has to be a better way. Why are you going to deprive children of something they love because of bad choices their parents make for them?

All of the software and applications we collect for you are 100% calorie-free!

Leave Your Privacy at the Door

As I sat here about to wind down for the night, I noticed a new post by my friend Robert Scoble. Robert began an interesting discussion on his blog to talk about Facebook and privacy. All of the points he makes are right-on, and I found myself nodding in agreement much of the time I was reading.

It gets interesting, though, in the comments section. As Robert is fond of pointing out, that is usually always where you’ll find the most relevant opinions and discussions on any website. For instance, Brandon Soucie points out that “when it really comes down to it, how “private” are your interests, favorite music, movies, books, etc? And in what ways can it be harmful to have this information publicly accessible?” So what if Facebook tells the world what music I’m listening to? You’ve been able to find that out at any time during the past three years by tuning in to my live stream.

Much of the information that is no longer private on Facebook are things you already talked openly about, anyway. We tell the world via Twitter where we’re at nearly every moment thanks to check-in services like GoWalla and Foursquare. I see people updating regularly when their Pandora station plays a new song that they enjoy. People recommend their favorite movies, books and restaurants all over the Web. Why, then, are you so shocked and pissed that Facebook is giving out this same information?

I’m not trying to claim that there shouldn’t be boundaries and limitations. If Zuckerberg suddenly decided to display my address and social security number all over the place, we’d have a huge problem. However, that information isn’t even listed anywhere on the site. Facebook can only divulge what we feed into it. I don’t tell the site what time of day I get out of bed. I don’t post on my Wall every time I change my underwear. I don’t even discuss what I ate for dinner, for frick’s sake. I still have control of my “privacy.” No social networking site can take that away from me.

If you want something to stay private, you shouldn’t be posting it on the Internet. Long before everyone “Liked” everything, that was a golden rule of being online. Way before the days of e-Wars regarding privacy and sharing, we knew in our little brains that there are some things we should just keep quiet about. At the end of the day, you are still the one in the driver’s seat. You are the only person who can decide whether or not something should be shared.

If you don’t like the way Facebook is doing things these days, you don’t have to be a member. Continuing to use the service while complaining to anyone who will listen is not the way to help facilitate change. As Robert says, look for the positives in all of this. Keep your secrets close to your chest, and run out to expand your music horizons.

Earn a Boy Scout Badge for Gaming

Forget about starting fires with sticks and setting up tents in the wilderness. Since videogames are played by the vast majority of children across the United States, the Boy Scouts of America have decided to get with the times. They will be offering a Video Games belt loop and pin to the Cub Scouts. No, I’m not kidding. I only wish I were.

To earn the belt loop, the kids must explain why it is important to have a rating system for video games, and check their video games to be sure they are appropriate. With the help of an adult, they have to create a schedule to do things such as chores and homework… and still fit in game time. They have to “do their best” to follow the schedule. And last – but not least – they have to learn to play a new game that is approved by their parent, guardian or teacher.

There are more steps to go through in order to receive the pin. They’ll need to create a plan to buy an appropriate video game. Next up, they must compare two gaming systems, explaining the differences between them. Another step requires them to play a game with family members in a tournament. They’ll need to teach one of their favorite games to an adult or friend. At least there’s some writing involved when they have to make a list of tips for someone who is trying to learn a new game. Playing a game with a friend for one hour shouldn’t be much of a stretch. Installing a game system with adult supervision is likely something they’ve already done, as well. The only halfway interesting step in this process is when they have to think of a game they want to buy and compare pricing at three different stores to find the best deal.

What happened to the days when the Boy Scouts learned things that added value to their life in some way? I recall having to do things like learn how to save a person’s life. I’m sure I would have enjoyed getting rewards for playing games, but I just don’t see how that would have really added something important to my education and the way I turned out as an adult.

You don’t need any badges at all to get the latest software for your computer and mobile devices.

T-Mobile webConnect Will Throttle You

The webConnect USB Laptop Stick provides fast, easy wireless Internet access for your laptop by automatically finding the best T-Mobile network connection (3G, HotSpot/Wi-Fi, or EDGE). The service will now no longer charge you an arm and a leg to connect to the Internet. Instead of charging you an overage fee when you pass the 5GB per month cap, you’ll instead have your service throttled. Exact details about how that information will be throttled has not yet been fully disclosed. In the meantime, the 200MB webConnect plan will drop overage fees from $.20/MB to $.10/MB.

The 5GB plan starts at $40, while a 200MB contract is listed at $25 per month. I’m not sure that this is enough of a “plan” to convince me to run off to sign a two year contract. What about you?

There is no overage fees or caps on the amount of software you can get from us! Check back daily to see what’s new.

Siri is Seriously Cool


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This is a Sponsored Post written by me on behalf of MyLikes. All opinions are 100% mine.

Siri allows you to coordinate your activities with restaraunts, local events and more just by talking to your phone. This is a free app which you can grab from the App Store right now. If you’re a busy person who has things to do, Siri may well be the answer you’ve been looking for. You ask – and Siri will DO. Forget clicking a hundred links in your browser to accomplish something.

Siri will automatically identify your location through GOPS, then search its partners including OpenTable, MovieTickets, StubHub, CitySearch and TaxiMagic. The app is free, but Siri gets affiliate fees every time you buy something or make a reservation through the app.

In addition to helping you do things, it also can be used to set reminders. Tell Siri to remind you by email that you have a doctor’s appointment this week, and it will do the rest.

Not only is this app fun and useful, it’s also on the cutting edge of voice technology. Siri is building variations on a technology developed by nonprofit research-and-development company SRI International, which several years ago led a $200 million research project on artificial intelligence, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Siri… you have to talk to it to believe it.

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