How to Circumvent Apple Music UX Nightmares

TL;DR: use Siri.

A lot has been written about UX issues with Apple Music. Sadly, this has become par for the course.

It’s not an issue of disliking Apple – it’s an issue of disliking how Apple has seemingly thrown the quality control baby overboard.

And to discuss major UX oversights with people who simply don’t see the difference between 15fps and 60fps is like trying to explain the difference between “there” and “they’re” to a toddler.

While I’ve subscribed to a variety of music subscription services over the years (darn near every one of ’em since they first became available), I’ve never really been one to build playlists or any other semblance of organization. Even being a light user, I have been dumbfounded with just how much of a hack job Apple Music seems to be at this time.

Does Apple Music work? Yes. Does it work well enough? Yes. Does this mean Apple did an amazing job with it? No.

I’m using Apple Music, and plan on using Apple Music indefinitely – but I have not bothered to launch the app directly since I tried it for the first time.

My primary way of circumventing the dead ends and confusing experience is to use Apple Music by way of Siri (which, by the way, I’ve never truly been impressed with). “Play” is a powerful command, and can usually get me what I want at a moment’s notice without having to trip through a mess of overkill in the Music app directly.

Sometimes, I feel like I’m the only one who sees that Apple’s cracks are getting wider and wider with every software release that makes a mediocre experience even worse. But I’m not the only one.

Apple can do better – if they understand that they haven’t been doing better. Releasing a sloppy experience is worse than not releasing an experience at all. I still can’t explain why iOS 7 was one step forward and two steps back – but that, to me, seems to be Apple’s modus operandi for every product revision.