Who Needs a Larger iPad?

Where there’s smoke, there’s fire.

Let’s do our best to avoid rumors and look to what’s in the code. In fact, if such spelunking did not happen, I would have hesitated to pen this post outright (because I do not like lending attention to rumors). Still, here we have it:

Both tweets were surfaced by 9to5mac in separate posts.

So, for argument’s sake, who would want an iPad screen that was physically larger (and capable of rendering more pixels) than iPad Air? I can think of a few rather largely-represented groups.

Obviously, this is not a comprehensive list of would-be users, but without knowing too much more about what appears to be a new iPad family member, it is impossible to apply the value of a larger-screen iPad beyond what we know it to be (an iOS device that carries with it a larger resolution that would scale to 263ppi on a 12.9″ screen – or 2x what the current iPad Air pushes).

Who benefits?

  • Gamers: smaller screens are more portable, but with the rise of mobile gaming (which, I’d say, includes any game developed with iPad in mind), I’d expect that great gameplay will look greater on larger surfaces. Even myopic platformist stalwarts could not refuse a larger playing area on any device.
  • Students: with the ability to run two (or more?) apps on iOS, research and documentation will be streamlined on a single device.
  • Casuals: I’ll stop short of saying “older people” (if only because I’m slightly north of youth myself), but for someone who wants to both view and explore personal media, surf social and the general Internet, plus get a little bit of necessary work done, larger screens on a trusted platform may certainly outweigh the alternative. Or, in other words, “smaller” iPad screens could have dissuaded casual users from getting iPad over a traditional Windows PC or MacBook to meet their exact needs.

Out of these three, I’d be inclined to believe that Apple would target the latter (with the formers in tow as a bonus). Many features in the next version of iOS seemingly have Windows holdouts in their crosshairs. These changes are coming around a time when Microsoft is set to release its next vision of what Windows can be. Users may very well find iOS more viable, but without “larger” hardware that gives these people the opportunity to replace their aging laptop or desktop, the updates are moot.

I’ve long suggested that the average user is already using their iPad as a primary computing device – but whatever Apple can do to further blur those lines will be perceived as an advantage.

We’re not in a post-PC era so much as we’re in an era when the PC still has its place but is largely outmoded by friendlier hardware, software, and service models for most consumers.

Niche markets (like gaming or production) notwithstanding.