PC Vs. Mac – The Truth

“Better” is a relative term. So is “best.”

It’s rare that I jump into the middle of a PC vs. Mac debate (hasn’t it been settled already?). However, this morning I watched a tweet from @Windows float by. On the other end of that link sits Microsoft’s own “PC vs. Mac” page, and it’s so full of mistruths, I (honestly) thought I was reading a piece from The Onion.

Now, I’m an odd duck – I live in both worlds. I’m a Mac AND a PC – it’s fully possible. Hell, when you buy a Mac, you become a de-facto PC (given that it can run Windows natively just like every Windows PC in the marketplace). I’m also a Microsoft MVP for Windows. I was also banned from promoting Apple products by way of their affiliate program. Just had to get all of that out of the way first.

I’m going to take the time to address each and every point that Microsoft is conveying, if only to deliver the truth to people who are really trying to figure out which is better for them. You’re free to draw your own conclusions, but (IMHO) Microsoft really did their userbase a disfavor by publishing this without first running it through the BS wringer. Well, that’s what the I’m here for, right? It’s fully possible to encourage people to buy into your platform without lying about the “competition.”

Again, a Mac can be a full-standing Windows PC. I’ve written an entire eBook on helping people switch between Windows and Mac OS X, too.

I loved Windows XP. I love Windows 7. Don’t get me started on Windows Me or Windows Vista, pl0x. Not looking for trolls or fanbois (though I’m sure they’ll come pouring in from both sides). I’ve done my best to clear the air for confused consumers, not incite religious wars.

PCs are ready for fun.

Oh, god. No. You didn’t. Really? Wow. Okay. That clears it up. Thanks.

PCs are hard workers but they’re also fun to play with. You can watch, pause, rewind, and record TV like a DVR and you’ll find that many of the world’s most popular games are available only on a PC.

You can use your Mac like a TV / DVR. I do it all the time. And it’s true that “many” of the world’s most popular games are available only on a PC – but a Mac can be a PC, and the Steam library grows by the year. What exactly are they trying to prove, here?

When you buy a PC running Windows 7, you can get a Blu-ray player, TV tuner, Memory Stick reader, or 3G wireless built in. You can’t get a Mac that ships with these items.

Valid point.

Most of the world’s most popular games are available only on a PC. And Macs can’t connect to an Xbox 360. PCs are ready to play.

Someone apparently needs to hire me to teach these people that there’s a big difference between a Mac (hardware) and Mac OS X (the operating system). Their imprecision aside, there is software available to enable Mac OS X to connect to an Xbox 360. Maybe this is the part where I should tell you that I have four Xbox 360s in my home?

Many PCs running Windows 7 are designed to connect directly to TVs, so you can watch movies and see photos on the big screen. Most Macs can’t hook up to your TV unless you buy an adapter.

Huh? This doesn’t even make sense. I can share photos, videos, etc. to my smart TVs just by sharing the folder and making it discoverable on the network. As pointed out by @BWOps, DLNA compatibility makes things easier – and is readily available for free on Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux vis-a-vis TVMOBiLi.

With PCs running Windows 7, you can play the video and music stored on your home PC while you’re on the go, for free. Apple charges $99/year for its online service.

It’s true that Apple makes it insanely easier to do with their MobileMe service (and this price is subject to change), but it’s completely possible – without any additional service required – to access your files remotely. If anything, I’d argue that Windows makes it more difficult for the average user to do – but that’s a subjective assertion, not a blatant mistruth.

Oh, and some MobileMe services work on Windows, too.

The computer that’s easiest to use is typically the one you already know how to use. While some may say Macs are easy, the reality is that they can come with a learning curve. PCs running Windows 7 look and work more like the computers you’re familiar with, so you can get up and running quickly.

By that logic, no Mac OS X user would ever want to switch to Windows because it’s too unfamiliar. Allow me to quote something that @Shally tweeted the other day: “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write – but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn.” [A. Toffler] I couldn’t have said it better myself. You’re cutting off your nose to spite your face to believe that today’s solution is going to be the answer for all of tomorrow’s problems.

When you use a PC, everyday things like your mouse and keyboard shortcuts work the way you expect.

Hang on. I’m laughing so hard right now, I’m crying.

Windows 7 was designed to make everyday tasks simpler with features that the Mac doesn’t have. For example, the new Snap feature makes it drag-and-drop easy to view two documents side by side.

Aero snap is nice, indeed. But I could have easily have written: “Mac OS X was designed to make everyday tasks simpler with features that Windows doesn’t have. For example, Exposé will show you all your open windows at a glance.” This is just tit for tat. You can cut, copy, and paste on either OS.

Sometimes the most natural way to use your computer screen is to touch it. And sometimes a real keyboard and mouse are hard to beat. If you get a PC, you don’t have to choose. PCs running Windows 7 support Touch, so you can effortlessly move between typing and touching to create documents, browse the web, read papers, and shuffle through files and folders. (Of course, you can still use a mouse, too.) Speaking of fingers, PCs with a fingerprint reader even let you log in with just a swipe of your finger.

Have you ever tried to use a Windows PC with a resistive touch screen? Let me just say this: it ain’t no iPad.

PCs are ready for work and school

Yes, because Macs aren’t? I’d argue that school IT administrators aren’t willing to switch, but… where there’s a will, there’s a way.

If you use Apple’s productivity suite, sharing files with PC users can be tricky. Your documents might not look right and your spreadsheets might not calculate correctly. Sharing goes beyond working together on a document. With Windows Live Mesh, you can access your home PC while you’re on the go, so your most important documents are always up to date and at your fingertips. Apple charges $99/year for its online service.

Google charges free, and is both Mac OS X and Windows compatible. Booyah. Maybe if Microsoft Office for Mac wasn’t so nasty, I’d give ’em some leeway. Actually, why didn’t they take this opportunity to promote their own product? It’s like they’re telling the entire PC and Mac world that their own Microsoft Office for Mac isn’t worth the price of admission?! But “your spreadsheets might not calculate correctly.” Wow. I guess Macs suck at addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division as much as I do.

You’ll have to buy a separate hardware adapter to plug your Mac into a standard VGA projector. Most PCs with Windows 7 hook up easily.

And by “easily,” they mean “after futzing with the settings on the projector for five minutes, if you’re lucky.” Microsoft is essentially forcing you into the past. VGA? Okay. You’ll have a top of the line notebook PC and be crippled by an ancient port? Really? Okay. Apparently, Windows PCs never need adapters in Utopia.

On a Mac, out of the box, you can only encrypt your home folder. With Windows 7 Ultimate, you can encrypt your entire hard drive and even USB drives. So your files can be safer wherever you go. And, with 25 gigabytes (GB) of free online storage, you can save your stuff in your personal cloud and use it from virtually anywhere you are.

Since they’re doing the comparison, how much does Mac OS X cost versus Windows 7 Ultimate? Don’t try to give me the BS that “Windows users don’t have to pay for Service Packs.” What do you think Windows 7 was to Windows Vista, folks? Oh, and in case nobody told marketing: Windows Live Mesh is available for Mac OS X.

It’s easy to share with a PC

Empirically, it’s easier to share with a Mac.

When you’re connected to the Internet you can actually use the programs and files on another PC as if you were sitting right in front of it.

Oh, because VNC (baked into OS X) doesn’t work?

With HomeGroup, you don’t have to manually set up movie and music sharing, file sharing, and printer sharing. Instead, it’s easy to automatically and securely network with all the computers in your house when they’re running Windows 7. And, when you’re away from home, you can automatically connect to the right printer on each network you use.

Microsoft DID make data easier to share data with other Windows 7 PCs that are running HomeGroup. FWIW, Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) will be using SMBX instead of Samba to better network with Windows PCs.

Sharing high-resolution photos used to mean sending huge email attachments. With a PC and Windows Live Mail, instead of clogging your friend’s inbox, you can send one small email with up to 200 photos attached. Your friend gets a preview album of the photos, can watch a slide show online, and then download high-resolution versions of the exact ones they want.

Dude. If you ever send me 200 photos in a single email, I will drive over to your house and slap you. Seriously. I’m not joking. They’re actually encouraging this behavior? Okay, well… if it makes you feel any better? You can send a massive amount file attachments from Mac OS X, too. How about just sending a link to your Facebook page, your Flickr stream, or wherever else you want to share your photos online? Don’t gag my inbox, either way.

On a Mac, iPhoto puts all your pictures in an iPhoto-protected library. If you want to organize, edit, or share your pictures, you have to use the iPhoto software. With a PC running Windows, you can work with your photos any way you like.

Thank you for explaining why I don’t use iPhoto on the Mac. They don’t force you to do anything. Picasa is perfectly cross-platform. You don’t HAVE to use iPhoto just like you don’t HAVE to use all that crapware that comes preinstalled on “many” PCs.

Plain and simple, if you’re a PC user, you have a world of compatible software and hardware to choose from. With PCs outselling Macs 10 to 1, most computer software is developed to run on PCs.

Has anybody bothered to talk about the quality of this “world of compatible software and hardware?” I’ve been more than happy with the selection available to me as a Mac OS X user. By the nature of Microsoft’s licensing approach to the marketplace, they will absolutely outsell Macs 10-to-1 – but what about overall user satisfaction? What about service and support? What about TCO? “Most computer software is developed to run on PCs.” This is an unfounded statement.

Most iOS software is developed to run on iPhones. #rhetorical

Apple’s productivity suite file formats won’t open in Microsoft Office on PCs. This can be a real hassle for Mac users sharing work documents with PC users.

Ah, but Apple’s productivity suite will import Microsoft Office formats. At least they’re trying, Microsoft. Moreover, if you’re still sending document attachments, KNOCK IT OFF. *points to Google Docs again* *points to Microsoft Office Live*

If there’s a Mac version of a program you need, you’ll have to buy it again and re-learn how to use it on a Mac.

Hahahahahaha! *catches breath* Hahahahahaha!

You can get the PC you want, in the size and color you want, with the features you want—all for the right price. With the best selection and price, PCs win hands down.

Yes, you can get what the market gives you – but that’s not “any size and color you want.” PC doesn’t win hands down. Sorry. It doesn’t. TCO isn’t factored into this ploy. There is absolutely a wider selection of Windows products available – yes. This doesn’t take into account build quality or service, but… you can find more PC options out there, certainly. If that’s what you want (an arbitrary value versus a good consumer electronics device), the choice for you is clear.

PCs running Windows 7 often come with features that either aren’t available or don’t come preinstalled on even the highest-end Macs, including Blu-ray, eSATA, multi-format card readers, touch screens, and mobile broadband support.

The Xbox 360 doesn’t work with Blu-ray, either – does that mean it’s worthless? Do you know how many Blu-ray discs I own? Seriously. I’m asking you because I have no idea. Everything I consume these days is fully digital. Moreover, my mobile broadband support comes by way of my mobile device – and every single Windows touch screen PC I’ve tried has fallen laughably short. I’ll give ’em eSATA, sure – but what about Thunderbolt (a far more ubiquitous IO port)?

Then again, if you want to watch Blu-ray movies on your computer (since OS X can read, write, etc. Blu-ray data)… Microsoft is correct, and Windows is a better option. Doesn’t mean that a PC is a better option, though – even though this entire debate is centered on PC vs. Mac – not Windows vs. OS X.

A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC. A Mac can be a Windows PC.

PCs are available in a full spectrum of colors across a wide range of price points. Macs are only available in white or silver.

I kinda like that. Plus, I tend to skin my notebook computers, anyway. This value is relative – largely irrelevant to them trying to prove that PCs are superior to Macs.

The selection of software for Macs is smaller than the selection for PCs. So if there’s a program you use on a PC, you’ll need to make sure it’s available for the Mac. And, if it is, you’ll need to learn how to use it on a Mac.

I don’t even want to qualify this argument with a response. In all the years I’ve used both Windows and Mac OS X, I’ve collected far more apps for Mac OS X – and they’re designed better, too. So many apps have similar interfaces – so once you stop treating Mac OS X like it was Windows, and Windows like it was Mac OS X… you’ll be more than happy with either one.

Did you hear that? It’s possible to be MORE THAN HAPPY WITH EITHER ONE. Or BOTH, for that matter. That’s the truth.

64 thoughts on “PC Vs. Mac – The Truth”

  1. Chris, that is some funny stuff and in many instances rather pathethic. Like you I’m a little bit of both (Mac & PC) but for anyone considering the transition to Mac but hesitant because of the “learning curve” or “software options” don’t sweat it. I let that hold me back for a long time, but when I finally made the switch my so-called “leraning curve” was about 1 hour.. and I was suddenly happier than I’d ever been with a computer.. as for the software… i’ve found suitable replacements (and superior ones in most cases) for virtually everything (with exceptions but nothing that would keep me full time on a PC). 

    Just Do It (ahem…)

    1. This is what I’ve been saying for years, but it’s difficult to get past other people’s (rather outdated and outmoded) biases. I also chastise anybody who claims that Macs are better for photo editing. *sigh*

      1. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Chris.  It really does boil down to a specific user’s preference.  I gave the Mac a fair shot and after much consideration, research and self-debate, I finally
        decided to completely kill the Mac OS on my 6 month old iMac and
        convert it fully to a Windows 7 Ultimate PC. I am letting you know this in the
        event there are Mac users who, like me, get aggravated with the differences between the Mac and Windows OS’s. Below is a
        list of things that irked me enough to make the switch:

        Printers:
        Accessing all of the available functionality and options for a printer
        either weren’t there or took forever to find on the Mac O/S. I also
        found that even a fully installed printer that is supposedly Mac
        compatible didn’t always behave as expected (i.e., I tried to connect
        and print to a Canon Selphy CP780 mini photo printer and the jobs were
        constantly hung in the print queue with zero feedback on the Mac as to
        the root of the problem).  I also experienced problems with an HP Laserjet P1005 not always communicating with the iMac but experienced no problems with this on the Windows OS.

        Navigation: Getting around in Mac OS X
        isn’t exactly easy as far as general program commands. Not to mention
        that the constant mind swapping between Mac commands and Windows
        commands on my home office and work office PC’s was causing me to go
        over the edge a bit.

        Programs: Let’s face it…the amount of
        programs on the market for Mac versus Windows is limited. I tried
        running Windows on my Mac using Parallels and at least half of my
        Windows programs, including games, business apps, etc. just wouldn’t run
        and/or caused the Mac O/S to freeze-up.

        Reality: I asked myself
        how much “work” I was actually doing on the Mac OS versus Windows
        (remoting into a Windows machine) and I came out with about 10% Mac and
        90% Windows. No brainer here.

        Switching an iMac to completely
        run Windows 7 was relatively easy, however, it does required you to
        install Apple’s Bootcamp software within the Windows environment for
        sound, video, network card, Bluetooth and the trackpad to work
        correctly. You never boot into OS X but it does show a Bootcamp icon on
        the system tray.

        Things to
        keep in mind: If you are going to make a move like this the Mac will
        need to have the Intel platform and not the PowerPC platform, although I
        don’t think we will see anyone making this type of conversion that is
        still using a Mac with a PowerPC platform.

        Retrospect: I wish I
        would have known more about the Mac OS before spending $1,700 on an iMac
        that I was only going to make into a Windows PC anyway. I could have
        brought a Windows PC for half of what I paid for my iMac with similar
        specs and so now I have a very expensive Windows PC. I will, however,
        admit that it is a pretty Windows PC and I get a small chuckle every
        time I look at the front of the “PC” and see the Apple symbol. I’m sure
        Steve Jobs is feeling the disturbance in the force by now…easy Steve, I
        plan to leave my Macbook as is…

        1. Procrapple bias is blatently evident here.

          Without belaboring all the obvious Apple biases, let me just pass along a couple of personal observations. First, why on earth would anyone, who hasn’t fallen out of the tree too often want to pay several times more for an underpowered, by PC standards piece of crapple hardware to run Windows. That is just an ignorant refrain.

          As for the crapple comments here. I paid a king’s ransom to buy an iPhone 4 which started failing within two months. My wife’s equally outrageously priced 20 inch Apple CRT monitor, in the G3 @7860557db598976841d3ae410827eb09:disqus 
          era lasted to about the day after the warranty ran out with a fraction of the hours that every of the great many non Apple CRT I used and had clients using for year and incredibly more hours on them.

          The only iPad I’ve had my hands on is one that my aging father bought on sterotypical 20 something granddaughter’s urging, when he asked me to help him with it. It is a piece of crap. The touch screen is next to useless on it.

          Yes, I know all you need to do is to take it back under warranty. However, that takes time and time is money, unless you are one of the brainwashed Applephiles who seem to feel it is their obligation to pay more for inferior hardware and then pay over and over again when it fails, in time or money or both. And statistically, 100% of the Apple products I’ve had first hand experience with have had hardware failures and I didn’t even come close to one of their Cubes, in its day. Me thinks I should be buying lottery tickets or Applephiles are liars about the quality and durability of Crapple’s offerings.

        2. Procrapple bias is blatently evident here.

          Without belaboring all the obvious Apple biases, let me just pass along a couple of personal observations. First, why on earth would anyone, who hasn’t fallen out of the tree too often want to pay several times more for an underpowered, by PC standards piece of crapple hardware to run Windows. That is just an ignorant refrain.

          As for the crapple comments here. I paid a king’s ransom to buy an iPhone 4 which started failing within two months. My wife’s equally outrageously priced 20 inch Apple CRT monitor, in the G3 @7860557db598976841d3ae410827eb09:disqus 
          era lasted to about the day after the warranty ran out with a fraction of the hours that every of the great many non Apple CRT I used and had clients using for year and incredibly more hours on them.

          The only iPad I’ve had my hands on is one that my aging father bought on sterotypical 20 something granddaughter’s urging, when he asked me to help him with it. It is a piece of crap. The touch screen is next to useless on it.

          Yes, I know all you need to do is to take it back under warranty. However, that takes time and time is money, unless you are one of the brainwashed Applephiles who seem to feel it is their obligation to pay more for inferior hardware and then pay over and over again when it fails, in time or money or both. And statistically, 100% of the Apple products I’ve had first hand experience with have had hardware failures and I didn’t even come close to one of their Cubes, in its day. Me thinks I should be buying lottery tickets or Applephiles are liars about the quality and durability of Crapple’s offerings.

  2. You made some really good points about the mistruths of Microsoft’s article.  On the other hand you did seem to be bashing them,  take your first point,

    PCs are ready for fun

    Oh, god. No. You didn’t. Really? Wow. Okay. That clears it up. Thanks.”
    I think I’ve seen Apple describe the iPad as “Magical”, everyone says crap like that.
    Good post though made me laugh.

    1. I’d be just as critical of Apple if they said it. The difference between Apple and Microsoft in this case is that Apple is actually doing their best to HELP Windows users.

  3. complaining about a company marketing it’s product? The worst part is most of this stuff is indeed correct and you’ve even stated it. Just admit you are a fanboy there’s nothing wrong with it.

    P.S. this was written on my mac osx which I much prefer to windows…

    1. Wow. Your response is so filled with grammatical inaccuracies, I have no choice but to believe you’re a PC user who made himself a hackintosh. 😉

      1. Haha 😀 no Hackintosh here, sorry I’m not as intellectual as you Sir Pirillo however I think I made a pretty valid point.  If you, with an unbiased view went to apple.com you would notice the same promotion of their products that every company does. You have to show your selling points and that’s exactly what Microsoft has done. Stop Hating?

          1. Mr Pirillo, most of the ‘mistruths’ you stated simply accepted Microsoft were right and gave an alternative.

            As for the last point I’m shocked, Sony Vegas, 3ds Max anyone? Although I would agree that Mac app’s are designed a lot better ($$$)

          2. Mr. Pirillo is not an Apple fanboy, ten years go he was a pretty hardcore PC guy and he has chosen to use both platforms so that he can remain relevent and take advantage of everything out there.

  4. I thought that was a really good post. Like you, I use Windows and Mac every day. I thought the Microsoft post was laughable, and very strange for a major global player. There’s a reason why BMW does not write ads like that about Mercedes, and vice versa. It’s not a sense of fair play, it’s simply because companies that make premium products do marketing about their product, not about someone else’s. They also think very carefully about how the reader feels about what they are reading. If you’re a Mac user reading this stuff, you feel insulted. So you are unlikely to buy Microsoft, even if the features do seem attractive. If you are a Windows user reading it, you feel as though you’re being talked down to. The pitch is saying “don’t even try a Mac — you need us to make the comparison for you, because you’re not equipped to make it yourself”. If you don’t use either, and are a soon-to-be first-time computer user, then what you learn from this is “there are two competing platforms — I’d better check both of them out”. This is exactly what Microsoft doesn’t want you to think about. The strongest reason why Windows sales always outperform Mac sales is that if you walk into 90% of stores selling computers, the vast majority of machines you see will be Windows PCs. Windows is the default choice for most sales staff, and telling people there are two choices is strategic suicide, as far as MS is concerned.

  5. I enjoyed reading this post and found a few of the points Microsoft made to be laughable. I agree with what you had to say about being able to like more than one. I like Windows for some things, OSX for others, and Linux for other tasks.

  6. I enjoyed reading this post and found a few of the points Microsoft made to be laughable. I agree with what you had to say about being able to like more than one. I like Windows for some things, OSX for others, and Linux for other tasks.

  7. > “Huh? This doesn’t even make sense. Unless these “many” PCs can somehow beam data wirelessly, they’ll require some kind of adapter, too.”

    They’re probably talking about the fact that all Windows PCs generally have VGA, DVI, and/or HDMI ports, all of which are common to TVs; whereas Macs generally have that wonky proprietary DisplayPort instead.

    1. It’s not “proprietary” and gives me multiple ports in one tiny port. I carry three “adaptors”, HDMI, VGA, and DVI.  My 1 year old Dell Latitude has ONLY VGA so I have ZERO options.  I’ll take a few adaptors in my bag for choice than no choice thanks!

  8. On the subject of compatible software: I’m a Windows user, and I can’t find a really good text/code editor, or a decent non–Adobe Air Twitter client. For the Macintosh, there’s a lot of choice. It seems that, these days, market share does not translate to choice of applications – evidently, the Mac fosters more of a culture of paying amounts of money for software, especially with the App Store.

    (An eerie parallel is Android’s greater-by-some-measures market share, but relative lack of compelling software compared with iOS.)

  9. It seems that this article is written to convince a Windows user to continue using Windows, instead of looking into Macintosh. Why would Microsoft advertise its cross platform software if they want the reader to continue to use familiar software on Windows? I do use Windows as my main OS, and I will say that some of these tasks are easier to do that on other OSes. Others tend to be useless (like setting up a homegroup with multiple versions of Windows including server and xp). A lot of other valid points seem to be about hardware. I love the extra choices when picking out a computer, rather than just a couple that Apple offers, plus its usually cheaper, which is always a plus. Most of the other points seemed to bring out the features of software built into the Windows Operating System. It’s nice to have all of this software, but there are lots of cases where 3rd party software just beats OS bundled software. I noticed that you included some Google products that you use cross platform. I believe that Google is producing great web applications that will change software as we currently think of it. For example, 99% of my time spent using Microsoft Office is in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint. Google Docs has all of the features I need, plus way better sharing tools, including multiple people editing at the same time, and offline support being launched very soon. Plus, Google updates its software often without us knowing, and with Chrome, usually a couple times a month. Considering that Google Docs is also free, and you don’t have to worry about annoying updates, or buy a new version every 3 or 4 years, I think this might be a no brainer. 

  10. Very good points were made in this post, but in some areas, you just sounded ignorant.

    You’ll have to buy a separate hardware adapter to plug your Mac into a standard VGA projector. Most PCs with Windows 7 hook up easily.”And by “easily,” they mean “after futzing with the settings on the projector for five minutes, if you’re lucky.” Microsoft is essentially forcing you into the past. VGA? Okay. You’ll have a top of the line notebook PC and be crippled by an ancient port? Really? Okay. Apparently, Windows PCs never need adapters in Utopia.”You’re talking as if projectors don’t use VGA. Sure, in an ideal world, projectors would stop using VGA – it’s honestly a dying port. But projectors *do* use VGA. You’re blaming Microsoft for projector manufacturers’ choices of using VGA. That’s just insane.Next up, you claim that Microsoft Office for Mac is “nasty” and that you’d give it leeway if it wasn’t so nasty. I fail to see why Office for Mac is “nasty.” Sure, it might not be as pretty as iWork, but that doesn’t matter when you’re trying to get work done. I see this purely as an opinion. Some people have taken the time to learn where things are in iWork and prefer it. I’m sure that if I took the time to find everything, I’d also prefer it. But right now, I’m sticking with Office. I’ve been using it since the 90’s and it just works for me. It’s all just opinions.Finally, you claim the answer to sharing any document is “Google Docs” or “Microsoft Office Live.” I applaud you for pushing the newest web forms of the classic productivity suites, but is it really necessary to sign up for a service just to send a document to someone? Not to mention that these web services will take *years* to reach the ease of use and quality standards set by native productivity suites.Anyway, I would still like to say that this is a very good post. Some blogs, like your own, are meant to have opinions, and I applaud you for voicing those opinions. However, you’re putting some of your opinions in the places where facts should be. Saying that VGA is horrible may not be entirely false, but it is highly based on opinion. I still use VGA every day. It’s easy, it’s everywhere (still), and it’s my choice. Same goes for Office for Mac. I use it because I prefer it. That doesn’t mean other people shouldn’t use iWork or OpenOffice. Online productivity suites might be for some people, but they aren’t for me. Again, it’s all just an opinion.P.S. I too use both OS X and Windows, and I would agree that having both makes life much easier. It also makes it that much easier for me to spot even the smallest fanboi-ism in a post. Honestly, I would say you prefer Apple to Microsoft. The fact that you have three Macs on your main desk (and one dedicated to running your live stream) speaks for itself.

  11. I dont own a Mac.  Matter of fact, I didnt own a computer until my grandson gave me one.  He told me “gramps, you need a computer” and five years ago handed me a laptop with windows xp.  That kinda started a family fued because my grand daughter, wanted me to get a mac.  Because of this I researched a bit and found out that mac and windows based computers are both pc’s. 

    The only real difference, to me, is that mac builds and installs an OS to its own line of pc’s (personal computers)..   The hardware is carefully chosen, and the OS tighly controlled with the goal to give its user a good experience.  Windows based computers are built by many companies and the OS is licensed.  The hardware isnt tightly controlled, and the user experience can vary greatly.

    But the two are apples and oranges.  You cant really compare them.  One is a complete package from one company, the other is a licensed product made by many companies.

    It all comes down to preference really.  You like a mac, get a mac.. You like windows based machines, get that.  They are both PC’s…

    btw, I’m completely satisfied with the laptop my grandson gave me.  I’m looking in actually buying my first Windows 7 computer soon. 

  12. I think I read one of the comments in which it stated that you were being harsh on Microsoft. The point is, if they didn’t use such blatant diversionary tactics on their website to ‘promote’ their product, then it wouldn’t be so bad. I put ‘promote’ in inverted commas obviously, seeing as the whole piece is centred more around bashing the competition than actually working out what the likely synergies are and promoting these instead.

  13. For years I have been forced to use a Windows based PC at work. Hating life.  So I think I qualify as someone that knows both especially since I use Windows 8 hours a day far more than I use the Mac.  Last month I FINALLY got permission to use a Mac rather than a PC!!!  I work in a Fortune “1” company, in the information services group, and so far I can report no pretty much no issues.  There are a few silly issues with directory services, annoyances really, but I can do my job.  I may be an island but I’m a VERY happy one!

  14. I had to unlearn PC and become a Mac. Unfortunately because of my industry I am forced to use PC programs therefore clog up my poor innocent Mac with GB’s of PC poison.  But I left for a reason.  I don’t think innovates at the same level as Apple.  You’re so fair in your observations and the article was a great read. Thanks for the belly laugh! :  “Dude. If you ever send me 200 photos in a single email, I will drive over to your house and slap you. Seriously. I’m not joking.”  

  15. Thank you Chris. I can finally agree with an article that I have read about the Mac vs Pc war. I use both, for instance if there’s a pc close to me and a mac not I will use it, this is not to say that mac is not convenient because it is, with cool little features like instant on, verybquick start up, build quality, lightness.. … I could go on all day.

    But as you said the truth is that you can be happy with either one. I have to use pc at school, and it’s more than good for me at school.

    Again thanks,
    Dan Thomas.

  16. I won’t lie: While I like both Windows and Mac machines, I tend to “pull my hair” less with Macs. While Windows 7 is an excellent OS, I end up working with Windows XP; XP for whom most companies still use even though Win7 is far better ; XP for whom companies won’t switch due to the excuse that applications aren’t written for Win7 ; XP for whom you can still write malware and virus for and I hear countless claims of stability ; XP for whom I’m tasked to backwards-image that Win7 machine to.

  17. While there is a constant debate about Mac being better than Windows and vice-versa, linux is never looked at as an option even though it offers a lot of the same features, the difference is it’s free. It’s sad to see so many people get locked into proprietary junkware that they continue to stand behind and support. Windows and Macs are both restrictive to what you can do with your computer; however, you slap a linux distro on your computer and you’ll realize what you’ve been missing out on. If you’ve never heard of linux (as a viable OS solution) I’d recommend taking a look at Ubuntu. The awesome thing about a linux distro like Ubuntu is you don’t even have to install it to test drive it; it allows for you to run from the CD or USB flash drive. Want to know the best part? It’s free–and always will be!

  18. FWIW, iPhoto lets you access the pictures. You just have to right click the library and open it and hit “show package contents”. I just export the pictures from iPhoto if I need them by themselves. In 5 years since I switched to Mac, I’ve found that I appreciate it organizing my photos more and more as I can search by person (faces), place, date taken, the caption I’ve assigned, the event. Very powerful for a free program.

    1. And every camera I have plugged into my Mac just works. No drivers needed. Getting much better with Win7, but still not as good as Mac OSX.

    2. And every camera I have plugged into my Mac just works. No drivers needed. Getting much better with Win7, but still not as good as Mac OSX.

  19. FWIW, iPhoto lets you access the pictures. You just have to right click the library and open it and hit “show package contents”. I just export the pictures from iPhoto if I need them by themselves. In 5 years since I switched to Mac, I’ve found that I appreciate it organizing my photos more and more as I can search by person (faces), place, date taken, the caption I’ve assigned, the event. Very powerful for a free program.

  20. People who own pc computer have buy new computers depending on how hard they use them especially Windows people every 2 years.  If they by a cheap laptop they get what they pay for and it gets all the viruses in the world no matter how they protect it.  Windows does not last long and it burns out.  I know more people who have more problems with their computers, and have to buy new ones every 2 years, from Dell or HP or from some other dump.  

    But, If you are a computer wiz and know how to build computer from the ground up.  and know what you are doing.  You can have best computer in the world, and will be able to run both mac and windows.  It all depends on the type of harddrive u put in and how you program your computer.  

  21. People who own pc computer have buy new computers depending on how hard they use them especially Windows people every 2 years.  If they by a cheap laptop they get what they pay for and it gets all the viruses in the world no matter how they protect it.  Windows does not last long and it burns out.  I know more people who have more problems with their computers, and have to buy new ones every 2 years, from Dell or HP or from some other dump.  

    But, If you are a computer wiz and know how to build computer from the ground up.  and know what you are doing.  You can have best computer in the world, and will be able to run both mac and windows.  It all depends on the type of harddrive u put in and how you program your computer.  

  22. If Apple wanted to end this debate, all they would have to do is make OsX available for every PC and laptop.  Since they have chosen to not do that, and run on “certified” MAC hardware only, the debate will rage forever.  You want a MAC, buy one…I can buy three windows laptops or desktops for the price of a Macbook.  Maybe they are not as good but we will really never know.

    1. There is a very good reason Apple does not do this, and a reason a lot of people never talk about, which ill get to in a second.  As for your three laptops for the price of one, i can guarantee they will not out live the apple.

      As for the hardware… this goes hand in hand with ‘it just works’  you don’t have the ‘i just got a new video card, shoot which drivers do i use?’ for most people, they run the cd and click ‘next’ 500 times reading a lot of useless gibberish.  for the gamers and other people, they most likely go directly to nvidia or ati or the hardware maker themselves. but there is still all this decision making.  Apple? apple -> software update -> update. done.  Apple can’t do this easily (as proven by Microsoft…) if you have it running on 50,000 different setups.

      1. Zacheryph is right about this. I have both PCs and Macs, but I have a 7 year old G4 MacBook that still works for everything other than my photoshop / illustrator work and runs great, without hardware issues. 

        My old XP laptops of the same age have all completely crapped out. 

      2. Zacheryph is right about this. I have both PCs and Macs, but I have a 7 year old G4 MacBook that still works for everything other than my photoshop / illustrator work and runs great, without hardware issues. 

        My old XP laptops of the same age have all completely crapped out. 

  23. If Apple wanted to end this debate, all they would have to do is make OsX available for every PC and laptop.  Since they have chosen to not do that, and run on “certified” MAC hardware only, the debate will rage forever.  You want a MAC, buy one…I can buy three windows laptops or desktops for the price of a Macbook.  Maybe they are not as good but we will really never know.

  24. Chris – great article. I know a PC and recently obtained an IMac on a trial basis. Both formats have their pluses and minuses. The Mac is certainly “new” user friendly and quick to learn. I do not find one format anymore productive than the other (I’m heavy into photography and use the current Adobe suite on both) and will happily use either. May I suggest to those fiercely loyal to either format – “try” the other format with an open mind; you might be pleasantly surprised.

  25. Show me a working, virus/malware/adware/spyware-free, user-friendly, unhackable, compatible with every piece of technology out there OS, and I’ll show you something that was invented in Fantasyland.

    Seriously, just about everything you can do with a Mac you can do with a PC and you can even do in Linux.  Just need to know where to look, what to get, etc.

  26. @ChrisPirillo I agree on a lot of you points. I might not have the level of technical expertiese as someone like yourself, however, I feel that the one factor holding me back from getting a Mac Mini (so i can be an Tri-OSer (Linux, Mac OS x, WIn 7) ) is price. I do plan to save up for one however as the last hands on experience i had with a Mac of any flavor was OS 9

  27. @ChrisPirillo I agree on a lot of you points. I might not have the level of technical expertiese as someone like yourself, however, I feel that the one factor holding me back from getting a Mac Mini (so i can be an Tri-OSer (Linux, Mac OS x, WIn 7) ) is price. I do plan to save up for one however as the last hands on experience i had with a Mac of any flavor was OS 9

  28. no their is a will but their is not a way to put mac hardware or software into eductaion not enough educational software(this is probably a yet  but when their is it will all udse linux because it is unix based also) and it is way to expensive unless your in a rich school district or apple goes down in prcing then i might even think of buying one b ut until then schools wont pay for one linux is free and can fit onto any machine and will have educational software when mac does 🙂

  29. Great
    post! Thanks for Sharing..Mac is much faster than windows because it uses
    less system resources and delivers more output. Even windows has a plus point
    i.e. its can be installed and executed on any system like celeron, AMD,
    Pentium and I series(i3, i5, i7).
    Cheers,
    Susan Smith.
    Promotional Products,
    http://www.promodirect.com

  30. Great
    post! Thanks for Sharing..Mac is much faster than windows because it uses
    less system resources and delivers more output. Even windows has a plus point
    i.e. its can be installed and executed on any system like celeron, AMD,
    Pentium and I series(i3, i5, i7).
    Cheers,
    Susan Smith.
    Promotional Products,
    http://www.promodirect.com

  31. Ironically, reading this, I felt like I was reading an article from The Onion. Please, get over yourself and your childish obsession. I also own a PC and a Mac, and this post… Well I think the Onion comparison says it all.

  32. Ironically, reading this, I felt like I was reading an article from The Onion. Please, get over yourself and your childish obsession. I also own a PC and a Mac, and this post… Well I think the Onion comparison says it all.

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