Defrag Your Hard Drives with Diskeeper for Windows

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Protocol joined me to explain why he chooses to use Diskeeper instead of the built in Windows defragging tool.

Diskeeper is an excellent tool. There is a 30-day free trial available for you to check it out.

With Diskeeper, it’s faster, has more options, allows you to schedule when it should run, and provides you with reports. Diskeeper 2008 Home edition puts your PC in the driver’s seat, allowing you to enjoy unprecedented performance and reliability while you work, browse and play. Fragmented hard drives drain critical system resources and compromise almost every aspect of daily computer use, leading to longer load times, persistent lags and costly crashes. Diskeeper 2008 Home shifts your system into high gear, ensuring that all your programs are running at peak performance.

Your computer will run faster with Diskeeper 2008 installed – period. You’ll enjoy using every aspect of your system, from downloading to accessing files to surfing the web with greater ease and efficiency. Leave hang-times, freeze-ups and other fragmentation-based crashes in the dust.

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47 thoughts on “Defrag Your Hard Drives with Diskeeper for Windows”

  1. They also make anti-virus software for the Mac, the overall message: Don’t use these utilities, they do more harm than good. People have lost entire drives because of iDefrag. That is why I steer clear. When a Mac isn’t being used heavily, the processor cycles will be used to defrag any files that may have been strewn across the system because it can happen when uninstalling SOME programs.

  2. I have 2 words
    Ultimate Defrag if you haven’t heard of it, In my opinion its on of the best defragers out there you can set any file or directory to be set on the outside tracks of the disk (which are the fastest in terms of seek times)

  3. I have 2 words
    Ultimate Defrag if you haven’t heard of it, In my opinion its on of the best defragers out there you can set any file or directory to be set on the outside tracks of the disk (which are the fastest in terms of seek times)

  4. I never said they weren’t good, I was saying that they didn’t need this stuff, therefore buying it will make decrease performance on an amazing machine. I love my iMac and will recommend it 9 times out of 10 to anyone who asks.

  5. I never said they weren’t good, I was saying that they didn’t need this stuff, therefore buying it will make decrease performance on an amazing machine. I love my iMac and will recommend it 9 times out of 10 to anyone who asks.

  6. I’m really torn on this issue, since (1) I haven’t defragged in several months and don’t notice any performance hit (XP with 2GB memory, NTFS drives of 250 and 400 GB, regularly running around 50 or so processes, frequent installing and uninstalling of applications, 24 hour use for work and play), and (2) in the past when using Diskkeeper it actually seemed that performance dropped and problems increased. So is there solid, scientific evidence to show that defragging is necessary and beneficial?

  7. Interesting video, glad you posted. For those viewers/readers interested, another option for defragmenting is PerfectDisk (www.raxco.com). In addition to defragmenting the MFT, it also defragments all NTFS metadata files (basically, another bunch of system files) that no other defragmenter handles, and consolidates free space so drives fragment more slowly.

    Regarding the expansion of the MFT, it’s not necessary.

    When an NTFS drive is formatted, it creates the $MFT and it contains a fixed number of records that can be used. As files are created, then these records are used. Eventually, the pre-allocated number of records is filled up and the $MFT needs to “grow” – allocating another chunk of file records. Immediately adjacent to the $MFT is created what is called the MFT Reserved Zone. By default, it is 12.5% of the drive. If you have a 100GB drive, then the Reserved Zone is going to be 12.5GB – pretty large if you think about it. If you look in Windows Explorer/Properties on a drive, the free space shown is the total of both INSIDE and OUTSIDE of the Reserved Zone.

    The MFT Reserved Zone is created specifically to allow the $MFT to “grow” in a contiguous fashion. When the $MFT fills up, it allocates the space for its next group of file records from the free space located in the MFT Reserved Zone. NTFS will avoid putting files inside of the Reserved Zone unless you get into a low free space condition.

    As long as a defragmenter, such as PerfectDisk, ensures that the MFT Reserved Zone is kept clear of files (a technically advanced defragmenter like PerfectDisk ensures that this takes place), then NTFS takes care of this automatically and there is no need to artificially extend the size of the MFT – which does nothing for you except take up disk space that can only be recovered by re-formatting the drive. In addition, with Windows XP, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Vista, defragmenters have the ability to defragment the majority of the $MFT online – further reducing the likelihood that the $MFT will ever be significantly fragmented.

    Thanks,
    Joe Abusamra
    Raxco Software

  8. I totally agree with the practice of defragging however I’d like to suggest a much better tool. Check out JKDefrag ( http://tinyurl.com/2g8cgj ). I used Diskkeeper for years but it has gotten slower and more bloated. Not to mention the hell of “continuous defrag”. Check out the simplicity and efficiency that is JKdefrag. You’ll love it.

  9. I am busy testing their latest version DK 2008, and I have also tested 15 other commercial defraggers and 16 freeware ones.

    You can find the “winners” of “The Great Defrag Shootout” or check out the reviews of all the products mentioned.

    Diskeeper is definitely not the best defrag program out there, and it’s by far the most expensive: up to $99! The home edition is $25, but you can get a full-featured version of PerfectDisk for under $40. My blog has a discount coupon for 20% discount, so you can get a “real” defragger for $32 instead of a partial one for $25. There are also some interesting and useful freeware utilities, so Diskeeper has got some real competiton on its hands.

    The built-in Windows Defragger is based on DK, and it suffers from the same problem: when you disk gets loaded (i.e. 20% free space) it can’t cope and the disk gets more and more disorganised no matter how often you defrag, even with the “Set it and forget it” feature on.

  10. Diskeeper has been a good defrag utility for me; runs stable and defrags multiple drives quickly without using many CPU cycles. So far I have not had a problem with it. I shall try the new version in a few days time.

  11. have been trying to find out if a 4g almost full and daily mega used u3 usb drive should be defraged or have some kinda maintenence done?

  12. Don’t defrag flash drives. Not recommended since they work on different principles.

    Defragmenting a conventional harddrive is to
    -improve/restore file access times for fragmented files
    -improve overall system performance since the HDD is the bottleneck in almost any system due to it’s mechanical nature.
    -decrease drive wear and increase drive life and therefore in the long run, reduce hardware costs
    -improve battery consumption [laptops]

    Flash drives are not mechanical, and so are not affected by those drawbacks. Infact, a flash drive has a finite number of read/write cycles, so defragmenting those *may* possibly reduce their life some.

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