DOS Fonts

Yes, you can easily change your command line font – so long as you’re running in a full screen session. I used to do this all the time (when DOS ruled the Earth). I’m not talking about changing the font in Windows, mind you – anybody can do that. Here’s a set of “.COM” files I collected back in the day, including a free DOS font editor from PC Magazine. They’re completely safe to use.

  1. Download these DOS fonts and extract them somewhere
  2. Open a command line window [run CMD.EXE]
  3. “CD” to the directory where you extracted the fonts
  4. Key in “MODE CON: LINES=23” [without quotes, tap ENTER]
  5. Tap ALT+ENTER to go full screen
  6. Key in “DIR” [without quotes, tap ENTER]
  7. Key in “F#” [without quotes, “#” can be 1 through 44]

If these instructions make no sense to you, then you probably wouldn’t find this bit of digital nostalgia all that much fun anyway. I’ve been a font freak forever.

It’s totally geeky – but I’m not going to explain the reason or rhyme behind why I believe it’s still fun to do. The settings aren’t sticky, so everything goes back to normal when you EXIT the session. I created “F4,” by the way (very Beavis & Buttheadish). If you wanna create your own, I’ve included FONTEDIT.COM. Pimp it, yo!

19 thoughts on “DOS Fonts”

  1. Pingback: SocioBiblog
  2. Enjoy this trick while you can. Beginning with Vista (and Longhorn Server), Microsoft has permanently removed access to full screen mode for the command window.

    (Sigh)

  3. Excellent prog Chris !

    I needed something for a menu prog i’m writing. Your font editor is ideal for the full sized Defender arcade game i’ve now got running by computer…only trouble was, i had to use a PC monitor and mount it in the cabinet upside down.

    How to do an upside down font for the menu ? i came here 🙂

  4. Computer Labs were never the same at UNI after I watched you perform this once. There’s nothing better than watching a newb try to access the ISCA BBS (See U of Iowa’s WEEG server circa 1992) and get the F3 (reversed fonts) and call the lab monitor over. *laughs*

    I attempted to load them at the library, but that attempt ended rather badly. I’m never taking back the book I checked out for my Humanities class because of how the staff treated me. 🙁

  5. Hi!
    After many hours of searching for a solution, I found your site.

    I hope you can help!

    Is there a way to eliminate the extraneous characters in a dos window?
    I have a very old app that includes strings like “

  6. What Ms taketh away, DOSBox restoreth. If you’re peaved at the loss of a fullscreen DOS prompt, try DOSBox. Or forget fullscreen. DOS fonts work in DOSBox even in windowed mode.

  7. DOS fonts loaded with Fontedit can be overridden by programs that reset or load their own fonts. A program called M10 loads a persistent screen driver that protects your font. That takes care of fullscreen, but one of my old programs used a proprietary font set, making the DOS box useless. Luckily XP still uses some fon files. I redrew one of them (I think it was ega40woa.fon) and made it large enough for a 1366×768 screen while I was at it..

  8. Dude! I remember DOS fonts– thanks so much for making these available. I haven’t been able to find the massive collection of them that’s cited in the DOS FAQ anymore!!

  9. I have a i430tx PR200+ chipset on a
    GA-586T2 motherboard with SDRAM slots
    which filled to 256mb running IBMDOS 5
    and Windows for Workgroups.
    I have it running on broadband and
    have DOSLYNX .39b and Lynx 2.8.5 rel 1
    installed and running great with a
    RAM drive. I appreciate you making the
    DOSFONTS available. Now I can change to
    a more pleasant readable font when using these DOS text-browsers. I wish there were more!

  10. Thx dude… I’ve been searching for this F##.com for soooo long (back in 1994). Thx for bringing back my DOS nostalgia… Once again thx man…

  11. What is the F36.COM file?
    It switches vowels to lowercase and consonants to uppercase. It also duplicates mixed case letters in the lowercase positions.
    It causes all text to LooK LiKe THiS.

Comments are closed.